Skip to main content
2019 WCGTC World Conference

Full Program

We look forward to having you in Nashville for the 2019 WCGTC World Conference!
Below you will find the schedule of sessions that includes many parallel sessions, poster presentations, and symposia covering a wide-range of topics. Each parallel session will last 25 minutes including questions. Each symposium will last 75 minutes including questions.

This is a preliminary schedule and is subject to change.

For additional information about the World Conference, please visit http://www.worldgifted2019.com. If you have any questions, please contact headquarters@world-gifted.org.

To help you organise which presentations interest you and to bookmark your preferences, please use the check boxes next to the sessions below. This is not a pre-booking function and all sessions are on a first-come first-served basis. Click the Create My Program button at the bottom of the page, then save or print your personalized program through your browser.

Authors followed by an asterisk (*) are not presenting at the World Conference.


Tuesday, 23 July 2019
9:30am-12:30pm
(Peabody College)Session Chair: Tamra Stambaugh, Vanderbilt University

Tamra Stambaugh and Sarah DeLisle
Vanderbilt University Programs for Talented Youth
USA

This preconference session requires registration. To register, please email headquarters@world-gifted.org.

Wednesday, 24 July 2019
8:00am-1:30pm
(Student Life 140 Board of Trust Room)
8:00am-9:00am
9:00am-12:00pm
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomRand 308
Session Chair: Tracy Riley, Massey University

Tracy Riley
Massey University
New Zealand

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc19.

Session Chair: Dorothy Sisk, Lamar University

Dorothy Sisk
Lamar University
USA

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc19.

Session Chair: Leonie Kronborg, Monash University

Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc19.

Session Chair: Christine Deitz, University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Christine Deitz and Kristy Kidd
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
United States

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc19.

12:00pm-12:45pm
(Rand Dining Center)

Lunch on July 24 is provided only for individuals participating in both morning and afternoon preconference workshops.

12:45pm-3:45pm
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomRand 308
Session Chair: Rena Subotnik, American Psychological Association Center for Psychology in Schools and Education

Rena Subotnik
American Psychological Association Center for Psychology in Schools and Education
USA

Paula Olszewski-Kubilius
Northwestern University Center for Talent Development
USA

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc19.

Session Chair: Margaret Sutherland, University of Glasgow

Niamh Stack and Margaret Sutherland
University of Glasgow
Scotland

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc19.

Session Chair: Denise Fleith, University of Brasilia

Sheyla Blumen
Pontifical Catholic University of Peru
Peru

Denise Fleith
University of Brasilia
Brazil

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc19.

Session Chair: Eleonoor van Gerven, Slim! Educatief

Eleonoor van Gerven
Slim! Educatief
The Netherlands

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc19.

1:00pm-4:00pm
2:30pm-4:00pm
(Student Life 140 Board of Trust Room)
4:00pm-4:45pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)Session Chair: Julia Link Roberts, Western Kentucky University

Join us for the opening ceremony of the 23rd Biennial WCGTC World Conference!

4:45pm-5:45pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)

Personalizing Learning: Power, Preparation, & Possibilities

Teachers hold the majority of the power in classrooms; they control what and how students learn. The transfer of control from teacher to student distinguishes personalized learning from differentiated or individualized learning experiences. Years of research on motivation have reported the academic and emotional benefits of sharing control with students by creating opportunities for them to have a voice in the design and assessment of their learning. In the process, they develop their strengths, struggle to overcome obstacles, and become increasingly accountable for their growth from mistakes and accomplishments. Personalizing learning not only enhances engagement and development, it prepares learners to learn with greater passion and efficiency beyond school. These experiences are particularly empowering for individuals with the greatest potential to learn; however, even the most capable learners vary in their readiness to take responsibility for their learning. As well as relinquishing control, educators need to be prepared to support the development of their increasing autonomy. In British Columbia (Canada), our public schools are in the midst of this transition for all learners. It’s an exciting time to share the foundations, practices, and lessons learned. British Columbia’s high ability learners will speak for themselves, bringing life to the process with stories of personalizing their learning.

Sponsored by:

6:00pm-8:00pm
(ESB Lobby)

Join us for the Welcome Reception for the 23rd Biennial WCGTC World Conference!

Thursday, 25 July 2019
7:00am-12:00pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)
7:45am-8:00am
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)
8:00am-4:00pm
(Student Life 140 Board of Trust Room)
8:00am-9:00am
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)Session Chair: Denise Fleith, University of Brasilia

Culture and High Performance: Inclusive or Exclusive Practices?

Intervention strategies for high performers belonging to culturally diverse populations pose several challenges for professionals in schools and public policies as well as in the wider community. The major purposes of this keynote are to: (a) describe teachers’ perceptions about programs for high performing students following the cultural context; (b) analyze inclusive and exclusive provisions for high performers in Peru, underlining the cultural effect of social support; (c) discuss culturally sensitive intervention programs for young scholars in the Andean countries; and (d) present the challenges for future high performers belonging to the Latin American collectivistic context.

The first study explores the variables associated with teachers’ perceptions about intervention programs for high performing students in different cultural contexts of Latin America. Results reveal that the perception of “exclusive practices” might prevent certain intervention strategies (e.g., acceleration) from being applied in collectivistic groups, while “inclusive practices” are included in public policies. The second study explores the relationship between Academic Resilience, Achievement Goals and Implicit Theories of Intelligence in a senior class of the Peruvian Academy of High Achievers. Results revealed that the Mastery-Approach Goal became a mediating variable between the Incremental Theory of Intelligence and Academic Resilience, among other results. Study 3 follows a comparative study on creative performance and the classroom climate for creativity in high school students of Amazon rural and urban state-funded schools in Peru. Results will be discussed in relation to the challenges for high performers in collectivistic contexts for the future.

Sponsored by:

9:15am-10:30am
STEAMProgrammingMiscSocial/EmotionalAdvocacyCreativityIdentificationG&T2e
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomSarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220SLC Commodore BallroomSLC Meeting Rooms 1 & 2
Session Chair: Linda Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University2.1.1 Project Period Table: A Creative, Successful Use of Type III Enrichment For The GiftedDelanie Almazan Anaya, United States; Tufic Habib Libien, Mexico; Erick Reyes Labastida, Mexico; Eryx Elizarraras, Mexico; Octavio Lopez, Mexico; Ian Toto, Mexico; Ricardo Valdez, Mexico2.1.2 Does The Lebanese Education System Hinder The Performance of The Highly Able Learners?Maya Antoun, Lebanon; Rayya Younes, Lebanon; Sara Salloum, Lebanon2.1.3 Shape Up: Developing Spatial Abilities For Steam Expertise and InnovationLinda Sheffield, United States Session Chair: Shirley Farrell, Troy University2.2.1 Practical Ideas For Improving Critical Thinking and WritingNathan Levy, United States2.2.2 Integrating Scientific Enrichment With Science Communication Skills To Promote Self-Efficacy and Scientific Knowledge of Gifted StudentsOrni Meerbaum-Salant, Israel; Bruria Haberman, Israel; Sarah Pollack, Israel2.2.3 Using Infographics To Develop Visual LiteracyShirley Farrell, United States Session Chair: Kimberly Clayton-Code, Northern Kentucky University2.3.1 Polyhedron Model of WisdomSareh Karami, United States; Mehdi Ghahremani, United States; Marcia Gentry, United States2.3.2 Camp Give: Possibilities Through PhilanthropyKimberly Clayton-Code, United States2.3.3 The Fun Toy of Education: A Model For Every Teacher EverywhereMohammad Rawas*, Saudi Arabia Session Chair: Connie Phelps, Emporia State University2.4.1 No Children’s Play: Early Childhood Sexual Harassment — Understanding, Coping, and Prevention In The Educational System and CommunityAyelet Giladi, Israel2.4.2 Covert Aggression and Minority Gifted ChildrenLouise Reid, United States; Connie Phelps, United States2.4.3 Social-Emotional Issues of Gifted Students and Bullying PreventionRaquel Lutterbach Giannini, Brazil; Cristina Maria Delou*, Brazil Session Chair: Melinda Gindy, Australian Association for the Education of the Gifted and Talented2.5.1 Supporting A Gifted Global Society: Advocating Through Exponential Influences, Fostering Partnerships, and Telling Your StoryCiminy St. Clair, United States; Kali Fedor, United States2.5.2 Establishing and Facilitating A National Gifted Awareness WeekMelinda Gindy, Australia; Deb Walker, New Zealand2.5.3 Tips For Advocating For Gifted Education: Strategy Suggestions From One State Nonprofit OrganizationCatherine Blando, United States; Maureen Marron, United States; Brett Monnard, United States Session Chair: Sarah Shuster-Tucker, RGI CreativeS2.6.1 Learning For A New World: Innovative Design-Build Enrichment For Creatively Gifted and All LearnersSarah Shuster-Tucker, United States; Sylvia Rimm, United States; Ryan Gerber, United States; John Stipek, United States; Maureen Goodwin, United States Session Chair: Poul Nissen, Aarhus University2.7.1 Detection Talent From The Perspectives of Students, Parents, and TeachersPoul Nissen, Denmark2.7.2 Identifying Talent Across Contexts Using The Tabs (traits, Aptitudes and Behaviors)Meg Hines, United States; Sarah Sumners, United States2.7.3 CancelledThis Session Has Been Cancelled, Australia Session Chair: C. June Maker, University of ArizonaS2.8.1 Criteria and Procedures For Accreditation of Assessments of Giftedness and TalentC. June Maker, United States; Ketty Sarouphim-McGill, Lebanon; Julia Link Roberts, United States Session Chair: Jilliane McCardle, Model Laboratory School - Eastern Kentucky UniversityS2.9.1 Empowering 2e Learners Through The Visual and Performing ArtsJilliane McCardle, United States; Mary Elizabeth Henton, United States; Karen Edwards, United States; Jana Mayer, United States; Christi Sexton, United States
10:30am-11:00am
(Student Life Center)
11:00am-11:25am
Social/EmotionalGuidanceG&TSTEAMG&TG&TSocial/EmotionalG&TG&T
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomSarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220SLC Commodore BallroomSLC Meeting Rooms 1 & 2
Session Chair: Frank Worrell, University of California - Berkeley2.1.4 Time Attitude Profile Differences In Personality, Perfectionism, Coping, and Environmental Concerns Among Gifted Slovenian AdolescentsFrank Worrell, United States; James Andretta, United States; Mojca Juriševič, Slovenia Session Chair: Fiona Smith, Gifted Minds, Pty., Ltd.2.2.4 Introducing Swift: The Smith/westbrook Intellectual Frustration Therapy, Designed Specifically For Gifted IndividualsFiona Smith, Australia; Dominic Westbrook, Australia Session Chair: Shengpeng Huang, University of Science and Technology of China2.3.4 Public Images of Gifted Programs In China: Analysis of Chinese News Reports On Gifted EducationShengpeng Huang, China; Yan Kong*, China Session Chair: Dieter Hausamann, DLR - German Aerospace Center2.4.4 Stem Talent Support: How To Create Innovative Young ResearchersDieter Hausamann, Ghana; Tobias Schüttler, Germany Session Chair: Carolyn Prince, Education Queensland2.5.4 Uncovering Gifted: A Profile of An UnderperformerCarolyn Prince, Australia Session Chair: Andrew Almazan Anaya, CEDAT Talent Attention Center2.6.4 Mental Speed Changes As A Consequence of Gifted Education: A 12-Month-Long Comparative StudyAndrew Almazan Anaya, Mexico Session Chair: Kimberley Perry, Emmanuel Catholic College2.7.4 Am I Different? Exploring Gifted Identity Formation Through A Lens of DifferenceKimberley Perry, Australia Session Chair: Vicki Phelps, Sumner County Schools2.8.4 An Exploration of Gifted Adolescent Motivation In Academic Learning ExperiencesVicki Phelps, United States Session Chair: Hyeseong Lee, Purdue University2.9.4 The Major Characteristics and Trends In Doctoral Dissertation Research In Gifted Education (2006-2016)Hyeseong Lee, United States; Marcia Gentry, United States
11:30am-1:00pm
(Rand Dining Center)

Group A go to lunch at 11:30 AM

Group B go to lunch at 11:50 AM

Group C go to lunch at 12:10 PM

Your nametag will include your lunch group.

11:30am-11:50am
(Sarratt 197 Cinema)Session Chair: Eleonoor van Gerven, Slim! Educatief

Lunch Group B should attend this session.

11:50am-12:10pm
(Sarratt 197 Cinema)

Lunch Group C should attend this session.

12:20pm-12:50pm
(Sarratt 197 Cinema)

Lunch Group A should attend this session.

1:00pm-2:40pm
Educator BeliefsTeacher PreparationEducator BeliefsLeadershipIdentificationMiscDiversityDiversityCreativity
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomSarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220SLC Commodore BallroomSLC Meeting Rooms 1 & 2
Session Chair: Mike Mhlolo, CUT2.1.5 Using Measures of Implicit Conceptions In Gifted Education ResearchErin Miller, United States2.1.6 Teachers' Perspectives In North Italy and In The Netherlands: How Teachers Approach Gifted StudentsMartina Brazzolotto, Italy; Lianne Hoogeven, Netherlands2.1.7 Mathematics Teachers’ Knowledge On Grouping Strategies In Teaching Mathematically Gifted LearnersLukanda Kalobo, South Africa; Michael Mhlolo, South Africa2.1.8 Teachers' Personality Factors As Correlates of Academic Achievement of High Ability Students In NigeriaOlufemi Aremu Fakolade , Nigeria Session Chair: Leann Pickerill, Paris Indpendent Schools2.2.5 Current Practice and Future Perspective of Gifted Education In SloveniaPolonca Pangrčič, Slovenia; Mojca Kukanja Gabrijelčič*, Slovenia2.2.6 Training Process of Gifted TeachersAndrew Almazan Anaya, Mexico; Dafne Almazan Anaya, Mexico2.2.7 Building Confidence In Regional Pre-Service Teachers For Teaching Gifted StudentsMargaret Plunkett, Australia; Wendy Holcombe*, Australia2.2.8 Reimagination of Gifted and Talented Services and Identification (paris Independent Schools)Leann Pickerill, United States Session Chair: Deb Walker, New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education2.3.5 Infusing Gifted Education Into Undergraduate Courses In Educator Preparation ProgramsDebra Troxclair, United States; Margaret Swope, United States2.3.6 What do Teachers In Denominational Schools Want To Know About Gifted Students and Gifted Education?Ann Robinson, United States; Amy Sedivy-Benton*, United States; Keila Moreno, United States; Christine Deitz, United States2.3.7 Eliciting Creative Thinking Across The Curriculum: Teacher Perception and PracticeTaylor Thompson, United States2.3.8 Teachers MatterDeb Walker, New Zealand Session Chair: Kimberly Clayton-Code, Northern Kentucky University2.4.5 Principles of Fearless LeadershipJoseph Gulino, United States2.4.6 Empowering Girls To Empower Other Girls: Sharing Outcomes of The Young Women Lead Conference InitiativeKimberly Clayton-Code, United States2.4.7 Developing 21st Century Competencies To Enhance Leadership Among Gifted StudentsRachel Zorman, Israel2.4.8 Gifted Leadership In A "Leader In Me" WorldLisa Murley, United States; Pamela Jukes, United States Session Chair: Karen Cahill, Sydney Catholic Schools Australia2.5.5 Acknowledging, Nurturing, and Celebrating Giftedness For Heightened Engagement, Achievement, and Self-Aawareness In Gifted StudentsJohn Charadia, Australia2.5.6 Benefits of Holistic Assessment From A German PerspectiveMadeleine Majunke, Germany2.5.7 An Archdiocesan Approach To The Identification and Selection of Gifted LearnersPenina Barry, Australia2.5.8 How An Australian Archdiocese Embedded Gifted Pedagogy Within A System of SchoolsKaren Cahill, Australia Session Chair: Michele Kane, Northeastern University2.6.5 Teaching For Talent Development: How To Motivate, Engage, and Educate InnovatorsJeanne Paynter, United StatesS2.6.6 Asynchrony Revealed: The Columbus Group StoryMichele Kane, United States; Barbara Mitchell Hutton, United States; Ellen D. Fiedler, United States; Linda Kreger Silverman, United States; Shelagh A. Gallagher, United States Session Chair: Michelle Lynch2.7.5 Educator Perceptions of Gifted and Talented English Language LearnersMichelle Lynch, United States2.7.6 Developing Equity and Access For American Indian/alaska Native Youth With Gifts and TalentsAnne Gray, United States; Marcia Gentry, United States2.7.7 Culture In Gifted Programming: A Native American Case Study At Standing Rock Community SchoolsEdwin Edpalina, United States; Yee Han Chu, United States2.7.8 Adolescent Latina Identity In Dual Language Gifted and Talented ClassroomsJenna Nelson, United States Session Chair: Wendy Behrens, Minnesota Department of Education2.8.5 Recognizing and Serving Diversity In Rural Gifted PopulationsNorma Hafenstein, United States; Kristina Hesbol, United StatesS2.8.6 Panel Discussion: Policies and Practices That Promote Equity In Gifted EducationSoha Elzalabany, Egypt; Wendy A. Behrens, United States; Julia Roberts, United States; Leonie Kronborg, Australia; Jonathan Plucker, United States Session Chair: April Dennis, Future Problem Solving Program International2.9.5 Seeing The World of Possibilities: Creative Problem SolvingLaurie Croft, United StatesS2.9.6 Creative Problem Solvers Today – Innovative Leaders Tomorrow!Marcia Delcourt, United States; April Dennis, United States; Sandy Horton, United States
2:40pm-3:15pm
(Student Life Center)
3:15pm-3:40pm
School AlternativesGuidanceG&TSTEAMProgrammingProgrammingDiversityDiversityAdvocacy
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomSarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220SLC Commodore BallroomSLC Meeting Rooms 1 & 2
Session Chair: Ahmed Mohamed, United Arab Emirates University2.1.9 Effect of Using A Science Enrichment Program On High-Achieving Students' Science AchievementAhmed Mohamed, United Arab Emirates Session Chair: Renata Muniz Prado, University Mauricio de Nassau2.2.9 Female Talent Development In The 21st Century: A Brazilian Online Counseling Program For Graduate StudentsRenata Muniz Prado, Brazil; Denise Fleith, Brazil Session Chair: Shoshana Rosemarin, Ariel University - Ameritus2.3.9 Was Korczak Really Ahead of His Time?Shoshana Rosemarin, Israel Session Chair: Denise Zigler, JPL-NASA2.4.9 Reach For The StarsDenise Zigler, United States Session Chair: Carolyn Prince, Education Queensland2.5.9 Advocating For Gifted Programming In A Low Socio-Economic School: Can One Person Make Change?Carolyn Prince, Australia Session Chair: Mira Alameddine, LWIS-City International School2.6.9 Catering For Gifted Learners In Lebanon: The Case of Lwis-City International SchoolMira Alameddine, Lebanon; Nather Simhari, Lebanon Session Chair: Jo Tuite, Ball State University2.7.9 Best Practices To Facilitate High Ability Lgbtq+ Student SuccessJo Tuite, United States Session Chair: Claire Hughes, College of Coastal Georgia2.8.9 2e Literature: An International Content AnalysisClaire Hughes, United States; Debra Troxclair, United States Session Chair: María Leonor Conejeros-Solar, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso2.9.9 Why do We Not Have Gifted Education In Schools? Facilitators and Barriers For Implementation In ChileMaría Leonor Conejeros-Solar, Chile; Katia Sandoval-Rodríguez*, Chile; María Paz Gómez-Arizaga, Chile; Sandra Catalán Henríquez*, Chile; Claudia Nuñez Chaufleur*, Chile
3:40pm-4:10pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)1 Overcoming Gender Bias In Stem: The Effect of Adding The Arts (steam)Pessy Sloan, United States3 Increasing Women’s Pursuit of Stem Degrees: Selective High Schools and A Challenging Curriculum May HelpPessy Sloan, United States5 Nasa Balloon Powered CarDenise Zigler, United States7 Teacher Perceptions of Gate Certification Practices In A Southern Californian District: A Replication StudyJessica Cannaday, United States; Jennifer Courduff, United States9 Connecting Students To A World of Possibilities In Authentic Science ResearchShirley Farrell, United States11 Developing Gifted Social/emotional and Academic Skills In A K-Fifth Gifted CommunityLinda Kirby, United States13 One School'S Journey To Implementing Identity Workspaces and Culturally Responsive EducationTiffany Blassingame, United States15 Self-Regulated Learning: What It Can Look LikeChiou Yen Chang, Singapore; King Koon Koh, Singapore17 Deepening Knowledge Through Visual Arts and TechnologyAlicia Weyeneth, United States19 Professional Development of Teachers To Improve The Education of Gifted and Talented ScholarsShelbie Dixon-Brown, United States21 A World of Possibilities: Gifted Hispanic Students Overcoming Barriers To Advanced PlacementAmy Graefe, United States23 A Possible School: The Educational Center For High CapacitiesJulián Betancourt Morejón, Mexico; María de Los Dolores Valadez Sierra, Mexico27 The Influence of Creative Classroom Environments On The Creativity of Children Aged 10-14 YearsXiaochen Ma, China; Li Cheng, China; Yan Wang , China; Zhiyu Xu, China
4:10pm-5:30pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)Session Chair: Margaret Sutherland, University of Glasgow

The Psychology of High Performance

Psychologists and educators, fascinated with the beauty, grace, and sheer brilliance of extraordinary performers, share many words to describe their interest in outstanding production and performance.  Texts on giftedness and talent tend to address what is known about identification, counseling, parenting, curriculum, or teacher preparation in a generic form – less on talent that is manifested developmentally in high performance within domains.  Certainly, focusing on advanced and brilliant young people with high grade point averages or IQs, and what can be done to support their continued growth is important.  Eventually, however, as individuals move into adolescence and adulthood, the label of gifted is less meaningful unless applied to advanced achievement and creativity in domains, fields, or professions.   Our work and that of collaborating scholars builds on studies developed and led by Benjamin Bloom and his colleagues (1985, Developing Talent in Young People), which explored similarities and differences in development between and among the domains of sport (tennis and swimming), arts (sculpture and piano performance), and academics (mathematics and neurology).  Bloom’s book continues to be cited frequently in academic and educational circles.  However, there has not been an update in over 30 years.  

This session explores what is involved in the manifestation of high performance, including the major role of psychosocial skills in varied domains. Much can be learned from domains where psychological science and practice are deeply embedded, such as in sport or business, and applied to less developed fields.  The session will end with a synthesis of important themes, highlighting similarities and differences across domains and gaps in the knowledge base, and providing some suggestions for future research on the psychology of high performance. 

Sponsored by:

Friday, 26 July 2019
7:30am-12:00pm
(Student Life 140 Board of Trust Room)
8:00am-4:00pm
(Student Life 140 Board of Trust Room)
8:00am-9:40am
DiversityProgrammingAccelerationSocial/EmotionalAdvocacySocial/EmotionalCreativityG&TIdentification
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomRand 308Sarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220Sarratt 363
Session Chair: Angela Novak, East Carolina University3.1.1 "We Can do It, Too!" Blended Learning Strategies For 2e and Gifted English Language LearnersJavetta Jones Roberson, United States3.1.2 Belonging While Brown: Navigating The World As A Gifted Student of ColorAshley Scott, United States; Tiffany Blassingame, United States3.1.3 General Education Teachers' Understanding of High Potential In Typically Underserved StudentsPam Peters, United States; Kelly Kearney, United States; Rebecca O'Brien, United States; Catherine Little*, United States3.1.4 Guiding The Gatekeepers: Using Professional Learning To Promote Equity and Access In K-12 Gifted EducationAngela Novak, United States; Katie Lewis, United States Session Chair: Debbie Troxclair, Lamar University3.2.1 An International Cooperative Problem Solving Based Program For Nurturing Future ScientistsChing-Chih Kuo, Taiwan; Chia Chao Li, Taiwan3.2.2 Effects of Pbl On Gifted Education and Best PracticesMucahit Karakas, United States3.2.3 Transdisciplinary Made Possible: When Gifted Education Meets Culturally Responsive Steam EducationDebbie Troxclair, United States; Chin-Wen Lee*, United States; Sheron Mark*, United States3.2.4 Project Textures: The Power of Team Teaching and Multiple GenresTommie Chen, Singapore; Pei Li Liew*, Singapore Session Chair: Annette Heinbokel, Institut fuer Enrichment und Akzeleration3.3.1 A Review of Educational Interventions For Gifted Students - Methodological Shortcomings and Implications For ResearchCaroline Sims, Sweden3.3.2 Teachers' Views On AccelerationEsra Kanli, Turkey3.3.3 Supporting The Needs of All Students: Curriculum CompactingKelly Miller, United States; Stacy Hayden, United States3.3.4 Long-Term Effts of Grade Skipping: Spanning 70 YearsAnnette Heinbokel, Germany Session Chair: Jill Wurman, The Grayson School3.4.1 Empathy In Action: A Toolkit For The Gifted ClassroomBeth Hahn, United States; Diane Witt, United States3.4.2 Gifted Students and The Exploration of Affects Through The ArtsJennifer Bartee, United States3.4.3 Scaffolding The Social Emotional Learning of Intellectually Gifted Children: The Casel ApproachSusen Smith, Australia3.4.4 They’re Gifted All The Time: Teaching Non-Academic Subjects To Gifted ChildrenJill Wurman, United States; Jessica Curtiss, United States; Alexa Fusselbaugh, United States; Stacey Angelillo, United States; Jared Scheetz, United States Session Chair: Chad Phillips, Henderson Community College3.5.1 Social Construction of Gifted Students In Federal PoliciesChad Phillips, United States3.5.2 Bibliotherapy In The Classroom: Using Picture Books To Support Effective Decision-Making For Secondary StudentsElizabeth Ebers-Truesdale, United States; Breanna Prochnow, United States; Joan Jacobs, United States3.5.3 What Can South Africa Learn From The Red Dot On The Map? A Comparative StudyAnnari Milne, South Africa; Mike Mhlolo, South Africa3.5.4 Pisa Gold – A Wealth of Potential Evidence Advocating Policy For Gifted and Talented EducationKathleen Stone, United States Session Chair: Lynette Breedlove, The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science3.6.1 Bibliotherapy By The Campfire: Building Social & Emotional Skills Through Picture BooksTracy Alley, United States3.6.3 Great Books For Gifted StudentsLynette Breedlove, United States3.6.2 Diverse Social and Emotional Learning Booklist From Around The World For Gifted StudentsRhoda Myra Garces-Bacsal, Singapore Session Chair: Rena Subotnik, American Psychological Association3.7.1 You Don'T Sound Like Sheldon: A College Course In Gifted Popular CultureRichard Mehrenberg, United States; Charlton Wolfgang, United StatesS3.7.2 Achieving Eminence: What’s Known? What Needs To Be Known? Does It Matter For Our Field?Rena Subotnik, United States; Susan Paik, United States; Renata Muniz Prado, Brazil; Leonie Kronborg, Australia; Frank Worrell, United States; Paula Olszewski-Kubilius , United States Session Chair: Ahmed Mohamed, United Arab Emirates University3.8.1 On Identifying As A Gifted Adult: An International Focus Group StudyMaggie Brown, New ZealandS3.8.2 Adapting Tests For Different CulturesAhmed Mohamed, United Arab Emirates; C. June Maker, United States; Hala Elhoweris, United Arab Emirates Session Chair: Nina Krüger, University of Hamburg3.9.1 A Thirty-Year Study On Identification Procedures and Program Options For Nebraska Gifted Middle School StudentsPatricia Hoehner, United States; Scott Fredrickson, United States; Dick Meyer, United States; Jude Matyo-Cepero, United States3.9.2 Science Olympiads: Talents Search and NurturanceAmaal Alhazzaa, Saudi Arabia3.9.3 Validation of Scat From Cty In Catalan and Spanish Language From Primary To High SchoolersCarla Duran Garcia, Spain; Xavier Berché Cruz, Spain3.9.4 How Is Need For Cognition Related To School Achievement In Particularly Talented Young People?Nina Krüger, Germany; Sören Fiedler*, Germany; Mieke Johannsen, Germany
9:40am-10:10am
10:10am-11:25am
ProgrammingGuidanceSocial/EmotionalSchool AlternativesCreativityEducator BeliefsSocial/Emotional2e
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomRand 308Sarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220
Session Chair: Joyce Miller, Texas A&M University Commerce3.1.5 Imaginarium: A Holistic Approach Toward Nurturing and Growing Gifted Girls So They Can FlourishBek Duyckers, Australia3.1.6 Ideas Matter! Fostering Social Entrepreneurship & Philanthropy In Gifted LearnersBarbara Swicord, United States3.1.7 Computational Thinking: Gt Applications Beyond The Math Classroom and Across The CurriculumJoyce Miller, United States; Isaac Gang, United States Session Chair: Renata Muniz Prado, University Mauricio de Nassau3.2.5 Too Many Possibilities: Multipotentiality As A Challenge For Career DecisionsTillmann Grüneberg, Germany3.2.6 School Counselors’ Self-Efficacy Regarding Gifted Students: The Role of School Counselors' Self-Competence and PerceptionHalil Aslan, Turkey3.2.7 Training Psychologists On Giftedness: A Brazilian ExperienceRenata Muniz Prado, Brazil; Daniela Vilarinho-Rezende, Brazil Session Chair: Tina Harlow, Guiding Bright3.3.5 Openness To Experience and Overexcitability: Same, Similar, Or Different?Shelagh Gallagher, United States3.3.6 Examining The Relationship Between Overexcitabilities and Protective Factors of High-Achieving AdolescentsAhmed Mohamed, United Arab Emirates3.3.7 Gifted Women'S Qualitative Perspectives of Everyday Creativity, Self-Awareness, and The Education-of-Oneself From A Dabrowskian PerspectiveTina Harlow, United States; Elizabeth Ringlee, United States; Susan Daniels*, United States Session Chair: Molly Isaacs-McLeod, Gifted Unlimited, LLC3.4.5 From Invisible To Protagonist: Positive Initiatives That Impact The Lives of Gifted Kids In BrazilMariana Monteiro, Brazil3.4.6 Where No One Waits To Learn: The Intersection of Professional Learning, Leadership, and Classroom ExperienceAnde Noktes, United States3.4.7 Radical Acceleration: College For Content Versus Sleepaway CollegeMolly Isaacs-McLeod, United States; Norma Hafenstein, United States Session Chair: Ingeborg Veldman- de Jonge, Conexus3.5.5 Adaptation and Application of Thinking Creatively In Action and Movement In Hong Kong and MacaoTin Wai Chiang, Hong Kong3.5.6 Handwriting and Spelling: do We Need To Teach The Foundations of Writing In Gifted Education?Miriam Ramzy, Canada3.5.7 The Power of Parents In Entering Primary School Levels: A Good PracticeIngeborg Veldman- de Jonge, Netherlands Session Chair: Leonie Kronborg, Monash University3.6.5 In Search of An Inspirational School Principal: A Dabrowskian PerspectiveJoe Frank, Canada; Janneke Frank, Canada; Peter Khu, Canada; David Holland, Canada; Audrey Smith, Canada3.6.6 Gifted and Regular Pupils’ Views of Characteristics of Good Primary School TeachersAnouke Bakx, Netherlands; Ton van Houtert, Netherlands; Maartje van den Brand, Netherlands; Lisette Hornstra, Netherlands3.6.7 Preparing Teachers To Respond Effectively To Gifted Students In Classrooms: Longitudinal Case Study ResultsLeonie Kronborg, Australia; Margaret Plunkett, Australia Session Chair: Richard Courtright, Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP)S3.7.5 Socratic Inquiry: A Pedagogy To Address The Social-Emotional Needs of The Gifted In The ClassroomRichard Courtright, United States; Crissy Brown, United States; Laura Courtright, United States Session Chair: Patti Wood, Samford University3.8.5 Self-Regulated Learning Strategies For Twice Exceptional LearnersChristian Fischer, Germany; Christiane Fischer-Ontrup, Germany3.8.6 Udl For Gifted and 2e Learners: Integrating Special Education and Gifted Education StrategiesClaire Hughes, United States3.8.7 Bibliotherapy With Twice-Exceptional Learners: Using Picture Books To Address Affective IssuesPatti Wood, United States
11:30am-1:00pm
(Rand Dining Center)

Group A go to lunch at 11:30 AM

Group B go to lunch at 11:50 AM

Group C go to lunch at 12:10 PM

Your nametag will include your lunch group.

11:30am-11:50am
(Sarratt 197 Cinema)

Lunch Group B should attend this session.

11:50am-12:10pm
(Sarratt 197 Cinema)Session Chair: Eleonoor van Gerven, Slim! Educatief

Lunch Group C should attend this session.

12:20pm-12:50pm
(Sarratt 197 Cinema)

Lunch Group A should attend this session.

1:00pm-2:40pm
2eDiversitySocial/EmotionalCreativityEducator BeliefsGuidanceSocial/EmotionalProgrammingProgramming
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomRand 308Sarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220Sarratt 363
Session Chair: Anies Al-Hroub, American University of Beirut/University of Connecticut3.1.8 Supportive Strategies For Guiding Twice/multi-Exceptional Learners, Their Parents, and Teachers In Diverse Schooling SituationsRaquel Bronsoler, Mexico3.1.9 The Assessment of Teachers’ Attitudes Toward Twice-Exceptionality: Development and ValidationPam Peters, United States; D. Betsy McCoach , United States3.1.10 Teaching Executive Function Skills: Bridging The Gap Between Theory and Implementation With 2e LearnersLey-Anne Folks, Canada; Heather Lai, Canada3.1.11 Examining Overexcitabilities and Adhd In Gifted Students In JordanAnies Al-Hroub, United States; Malak Krayem, Lebanon Session Chair: Angela Novak, East Carolina University3.2.8 Productive Giftedness of Eminent African American Writers: Maya Angelou and Langston HughesKenya Marshall-Harper, United States; Susan Paik, United States3.2.9 Reading Rainbow Remix: Fostering Cultural Competence of Gifted Teachers Through Literature In Professional Learning SettingsKatie Lewis, United States; Angela Novak, United States3.2.10 Art Education: A Tool For Talent Development For Underrepresented Gifted and Talented StudentsMaria Katsaros-Molzahn, United States3.2.11 How do You Prepare Gifted and Talented Teachers For Student Diversity?Karen Blake Qualls, United States; Beth Hahn, United States; Tracy Alley, United States; Aimee Fletcher, United States; Kimberly Gordon, United States Session Chair: Lisa van Gemert, Lisa Van Gemert, LLC3.3.8 Survival Mode: Trauma-Informed Practices For Gifted StudentsEmily Kircher-Morris, United States3.3.9 Giftedness and TraumaAdam Laningham, United States3.3.10 Assessment of The Gifted Adolescents' Functional State of The Organism Under The Psychological StressMadlena Arakelyan, Armenia3.3.11 Addressing Suicide In Gifted Youth: Educator Response To Existential CrisisLisa van Gemert, United States Session Chair: Daniela Vilarinho-Rezende, UniAnchieta3.4.8 Ways To Enhance Creative Behavior Using Torrance’s IndicatorsBarbara Swicord, United States3.4.9 Examples of Best Practice Around The World As A Model For Change In Gifted EducationEva Vondrakova, Czech Republic3.4.10 Shining A Spotlight of Possibilities On Technology For Gifted LearnersShirley Farrell, United States3.4.11 Professors’ and Students’ Perceptions of Information and Communication Technologies In Higher Education: Creativity and MotivationDaniela Vilarinho-Rezende, Brazil; Denise Fleith, Brazil Session Chair: Connie Phelps, Emporia State University3.5.8 Relationship Between Anti-Intellectualism and Attitudes Toward Gifted Education Among Emerging School LeadersMeredith Austin, United States3.5.9 Primary School Principals' Support Toward Teaching and Learning of Gifted Learners In Inclusive ClassroomsMotshidisi Gertrude van Wyk , South Africa; Michael Kainose Mhlolo, South Africa3.5.10 The Role of School Trustees In Ensuring Gifted Education In SchoolsJohn Curry, Canada3.5.11 Professional Learning Experiences That Support Growth StagesConnie Phelps, United States; Margaret (peggy) Thorpe, United States; Louise Reid, United States Session Chair: Eleonoor van Gerven, Slim! Educatief3.6.8 CancelledThis Session Has Been Cancelled, United States3.6.9 Developing Essential Skills Such As Self-Insight, Self-Management and Creative ThinkingNora Steenbergen-Penterman, Netherlands3.6.10 Coaching Creative, High-Potential Drop-Outs In Their Search For MeaningDesirée Houkema, Netherlands; Albert Kaput, Netherlands3.6.11 Sip: The Systemic Intervention Protocol To Support Talent Development For Underachieving Gifted StudentsEleonoor van Gerven, Netherlands Session Chair: Sarah Awad, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg3.7.8 Social-Emotional Skills Supporting Gifted Development: Keys To Unlocking PotentialMegan Parker Peters, United States; Emily Mofield, United StatesS3.7.9 Embodied Cognition: Findings and Practical ImplicationsSarah Awad, Germany; Mariam Alghawi, United Arab Emirates; Thomas Eberle, Germany; Wilma Vialle, Australia; Albert Ziegler, Germany; Zinaida Adelhardt*, Germany; Tobias Debatin*, Germany; Barbara Jacob*, Germany; Stefan Markus*, Germany Session Chair: Tillmann Grüneberg, University of Leipzig3.8.8 Sports Talents Psychosocial Development: Periodized Psychological Assessment ContributionsLuis Ferreira, Portugal; Denise Fleith, Brazil; Fabrizio Veloso, Brazil3.8.9 Mathematics Talent Search: Differences In Mathematical Giftedness In Girls and BoysNina Krüger, Germany; Sören Fiedler, Germany3.8.10 do Honors Students Study More? Exploring Patterns of Time Use For Honors College StudentsAngie Miller, United States3.8.11 The Gap Between Complex Models of Giftedness and The Identification of Gifted Clients In CounselingTillmann Grüneberg, Germany Session Chair: Tamra Stambaugh, Vanderbilt University3.9.8 Applying Methods For Helping Gifted Students Learn Native Language More EffectivelyLi Weng, China3.9.9 Integrating Art and The Smithsonian Learning Lab In The Gifted Language Arts ClassroomYolanda Toni, United States3.9.10 Museum Studies For The Gifted: Making Art More Inclusive and Appealing For The TalentedDelanie Almazan Anaya, United States3.9.11 Developing Expertise By Modeling The Thinking of A Literary Analyst and Differentiating InstructionTamra Stambaugh, United States; Emily Mofield, United States
2:40pm-3:10pm
3:10pm-4:25pm
ProgrammingIdentificationTalent DevelopmentGuidanceProgrammingSocial/EmotionalG&TDiversitySTEAM
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomRand 308Sarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220Sarratt 363
Session Chair: Shelagh Gallagher, Engaged Education3.1.12 Supporting Gifted Students’ Need For Choice and Challenge To Maximize Gifts, Talents, and PotentialAmy Graefe, United States3.1.13 Effective Strategies For Increasing Choice and Voice of Gifted LearnersDiane Heacox, United States; Wendy Behrens, United States3.1.14 Lessons Learned About Curriculum For Gifted Through 20 Years With Problem-Based LearningShelagh Gallagher, United States Session Chair: Marcia Gentry, Purdue University3.2.12 Identifying Gifted English Language LearnersMichelle Dubois, United States; Robin Greene, United States3.2.13 Identifying Diverse Gifted Students In Large U.s. Urban DistrictsRae Lymer, United States; Dennis Jutras, United States3.2.14 Validation Study of The Hope Scale: Identifying Gifted Students From Low-Income and Multicultural FamiliesHyeseong Lee, United States; Marcia Gentry, United States Session Chair: Susan Corwith, Northwestern University3.3.12 Individualized Academic Pathways In U.s. and International Schools: Rethinking Pace, Progression, Personalization, Programming and PurposeAnita Churchville, India3.3.13 The Construction and Implementation of A School-Based Talent Development ProgramKai-Ju Huang, Taiwan; Chien-Hong Yu, Taiwan3.3.14 Identifying and Nurturing Exceptional Ability In Young Children: A Talent Development ApproachSusan Corwith, United States Session Chair: Elizabeth Ebers-Truesdale, Lincoln Public Schools3.4.12 Helping Anxious Students Build Confidence and AchievementSylvia Rimm, United States3.4.13 Impact of Boredom and Belonging On Feelings of Anxiety and Depression Among Gifted StudentsTim Stambaugh, United States; Tamra Stambaugh, United States3.4.14 Solving Underachievement: Eleven Steps To Strengthening Tenacity, Resilience, and Mental PerseveranceElizabeth Ebers-Truesdale, United States; Joan Jacobs, United States Session Chair: Tingzhao Zhang, South China Normal University3.5.12 Providing Multiple Pathways To Creating A Poetry Portfolio Through Process DifferentiationKia Yin Jassie Teo, Singapore3.5.13 Research and Teaching Practice of The Original English Book Instruction For The Intellectually Gifted ChildrenZhihui Wang , China3.5.14 Pedagogical Approaches: A Study of Gifted Readers In The Primary Classroom In China and ScotlandTingzhao Zhang, United Kingdom Session Chair: Carmel Meehan3.6.12 Spirituality and Sex: Our Tales of Positive DisintegrationJoi Lin, United States3.6.13 Social and Emotional Gifted Characteristics and Over-Excitabilities In Students and In TeachersNorma Hafenstein, United States3.6.14 The Metaphorical Masks of Dabrowski'S OverexcitabilitiesSusan Nikakis, Australia; Carmel Meehan, Australia Session Chair: Pamela Clinkenbeard, University of Wisconsin-WhitewaterS3.7.12 Neuroscience and Gifted Education: Foundation For Practice Or Application Gap?Pamela Clinkenbeard, United States; Erin Miller, United States; Susan Assouline, United States; Curtis Bradley, United States Session Chair: Terry Friedrichs , Friedrichs EducationS3.8.12 Gifted Lgbtq Students Around The World: Needs and ResponsesTerence Friedrichs, United States; Fiona Smith, Australia; Frans Corten, Netherlands; Susan Jackson, Canada; Orla Dunne, Canada Session Chair: Antonia (toni) Szymanski, Western Kentucky University3.9.12 Wired From Birth: Technology and The Gifted Adolescent BrainJill Wurman, United States; Melissa Bilash, United States3.9.13 Gifted + 2e + Robotics = True PeersMolly Isaacs-McLeod, United States3.9.14 Using 3d Printing To Engage Gifted LearnersAntonia (toni) Szymanski, United States; Andrea Paganelli, United States; Janet Tassell, United States
4:35pm-5:00pm
(Sarratt 197 Cinema)
5:15pm-6:15pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)Session Chair: Tracy Riley, Massey University

Unleashing Indigenous potential: The purpose, power, and promise of gifted education

One of the greatest challenges impacting gifted Indigenous students’ participation in education concerns the restoration and experience of cultural pride and efficacy in their lives. Low teacher expectations of Indigenous students, inappropriate gifted identification criteria, ruinous media misrepresentation, and internalised deficit thinking by Indigenous students themselves, are key reasons why Indigenous under-participation in gifted education exists and persists.In this presentation, I use Aotearoa New Zealand as a case study, focusing on how Māori identity development affects the wellbeing, motivation, and academic engagement of gifted Māori students. Along with describing the importance and manifestation of gifted potential in Māori students’ lives, I offer solutions for change using the findings of the Ka Awatea study (Macfarlane, Webber, McRae and Cookson-Cox, 2014). Five social-psychological themes concerning the personal, familial, school, and community conditions for gifted Maori students thriving are discussed: Mana Whānau (familial pride), Mana Motuhake (personal pride and a sense of embedded achievement), Mana Tū (tenacity and self-esteem), Mana Ūkaipo (cultural belonging and connectedness) and Mana Tangatarua (the ability to maximise their bi- and multi-cultural knowledge bases).

Sponsored by:

6:15pm-7:00pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)
Saturday, 27 July 2019
7:30am-12:00pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)
8:00am-4:00pm
(Student Life 140 Board of Trust Room)
8:00am-9:40am
CreativityParenting2eSchool AlternativesUnderachievementSTEAMAdvocacyAdvocacyProgramming
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomSarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220SLC Commodore BallroomSLC Meeting Rooms 1 & 2
Session Chair: Celia Whitler, Grassland Elementary School / Nashville area4.1.1 Creativity and Problem-Based Learning: Tips and Tricks For TeachersAnne M. Roberts, United States; Lindsay Ellis Lee, United States4.1.2 Creativity: A Universal Language For Global ClassroomsPatti Drapeau, United States4.1.3 The Paradox of Creativity and RigorSylvia Rimm, United States4.1.4 Collaborative Songwriting As An Educational Activity For The Gifted LearnerCelia Whitler, United States Session Chair: Claudette van Ravenstein, Harmony Public Schools4.2.1 Great Expectations But Misunderstood: Addressing Executive Function Skills For Black, Gifted StudentsTiffany Blassingame, United States; Ashley Scott, United States4.2.2 Extreme Parenting = Extreme Self-CareMichele Kane, United States4.2.3 How To Create A More Well-Rounded Gifted and Talented Program With Booster Program ComponentsClaudette van Ravenstein, United States4.2.4 Examining Underrepresented Cultures and Marginalized Families' Perceptions of Success Across Educational Pipelines In Rural CommunitiesJustine López , United States; Louise El Yaafouri (kreuzer), United States Session Chair: Edward R Amend, Amend Psychological Services4.3.1 Yes, Dad. I Can Hear You! I'M Choosing To Ignore YouMaynard Erece, Australia; Borja-Erece Josephine, Australia; Maynah Josephine Lourellen Borja Erece, Australia4.3.2 Irritability and The 2e BrainJulie Skolnick, United States; Joanna Haase, United States4.3.3 Educating Twice Exceptional Elementary Students: What Works? What Doesn'T Work? A Parent’s PerspectiveAmanda Drury, Australia4.3.4 Misdiagnosis and Missed Diagnosis of Gifted IndividualsEdward R Amend, United States Session Chair: Kirsten Stein, Athena's Advanced Academy, LLC4.4.1 Homeschooling The Gifted: Experiences From Australian and Chilean ContextsMaria Leonor Conejeros-Solar, Chile; Susen Smith, Australia4.4.2 The Gifted Speak About Gifted Identity, Human Worth, and Self-EsteemRosemary Keighley, Australia4.4.3 Discover A Powerful Online Learning Model Designed For Gifted StudentsKirsten Stein, United States4.4.4 CancelledThis Session Has Been Cancelled, Australia Session Chair: Joan Jacobs, Lincoln Public Schools4.5.1 Engaging The Gifted But Reluctant LearnerDiane Heacox, United States4.5.2 Revisiting Underachievement: How We'Ve Gotten The Words All WrongLisa van Gemert, United States4.5.3 Underachievement Amongst Gifted Students: How To Diagnose and Treat ItTodd Stanley, United States4.5.4 Where’d You Put My Trombone?: Parenting Strategies For Improving Executive FunctioningJoan Jacobs, United States; Elizabeth Ebers-Truesdale, United States Session Chair: Bronwyn Macfarlane, University of Arkansas at Little Rock4.6.1 T2i: Talent, Intelligence, Innovation: Experimental Protocol For Steam ProfilesAndrée Therrien, CanadaS4.6.2 Specialized Schools For Talent Development: Delivering An Advanced Education ProgramBronwyn Macfarlane, United States; Julia Roberts , United States; Christina Amspaugh , United States; Nancy Hertzog , United States; Kristina Ayers Paul, United States Session Chair: Lesley Henderson, Flinders University4.7.1 Leveraging Organizational Development In Support of Gifted EducationMaureen Marron, United States; Susan Wouters, United States4.7.2 Connect, Collaborate, and Create: Growing Gifted Advocacy In Your Part of The WorldTerry Bradley, United States; Nanette Jones, United States4.7.3 Growing Researchers Through National Professional Gifted AssociationsLesley Henderson, Australia; Tracy Riley, New Zealand Session Chair: Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik, University of Iowa Belin-Blank Center4.8.1 Issues Impacting Inclusive Education For Highly Able Students In South Africa - Renewed Advocacy EffortsGillian Eriksson, United States; Kimberley Chandler, United States; Dimakatso Agnes Mohokare*, South AfricaS4.8.2 Grade-Skipping, Subject Acceleration, and Early Entrance To Kindergarten: Developing Academic Acceleration PoliciesAnn Lupkowski-Shoplik, United States; Wendy Behrens, United States; Susan Assouline, United States Session Chair: Terry Friedrichs , Friedrichs Education4.9.1 Escape The ClassroomKayla Busse, United States; Kate Garis , United States; Cathy Field, United StatesS4.9.2 Gifted Teens and College-Level Research: Factors In Their SuccessManashri Bhor, United States; Anish Kulkarni, United States; Amogh Kulkarni, United States; Terry Friedrichs , United States; Devesh Bhor, United States
9:40am-10:00am
(Student Life Center)
10:00am-11:15am
Social/EmotionalParentingSocial/EmotionalDiversityProgrammingSchool Alternatives2eSTEAMGrouping
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomSarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220SLC Commodore BallroomSLC Meeting Rooms 1 & 2
Session Chair: Janette Boazman, University of Dallas4.1.5 The Character Education of Gifted and Talented ChildrenKubra Kirca Demirbaga, United Kingdom4.1.6 Gifted Characteristics and Satisfaction With Life: Mediating and Moderating Effects of General Self-EfficacyDaniel Shek, Hong Kong; Alan Cheung, Hong Kong; Anna Hui, Hong Kong; Huimin Liu, Hong Kong; Xiaoyan Sun, Hong Kong4.1.7 Gifted Student Hopefulness: A Goal Directed Strengths Approach For Student Success and Personal Well-BeingJanette Boazman, United States Session Chair: Jane Farias Chagas Ferreira, University of Brasilia4.2.5 An Analysis of Awareness of Parents of Gifted Children In TurkeyNüket Afat, Turkey4.2.6 Contribution of Parental Style On Critical Thinking and MotivationAdviye Pinar Konyalioglu, Turkey; Sevgi Birsel Nemlioglu, Turkey; Umit Davasligil, Turkey4.2.7 A Study of The Profile of Brazilian Families With Gifted ChildrenJane Farias Chagas Ferreira, Brazil; Sheila Perla Maria de Andrade da Silva*, Brazil Session Chair: Bek Duyckers, Imaginarium @ Perth College4.3.5 Meeting The Affective Needs of Gifted Students While Addressing Required CurriculumTamra Stambaugh, United States4.3.6 Supporting Gifted Students’ Social-Emotional Needs In A Mentoring ProgramShirley Moon Ling Kwok, Hong Kong4.3.7 Influence of A Mentoring Program On Gifted Girls' Social, Emotional, and Academic DevelopmentBek Duyckers, Australia Session Chair: Hoda Kilani, The Right Career and School Fit4.4.5 Impact of Inclusion On The Functioning of Students With Special Educational NeedsNidal Jouni, Lebanon; Anies Alhroub, Lebanon4.4.6 Global Competencies For P-20 Gifted LearnersConnie Phelps, United States; Louise Reid, United States4.4.7 Exploring The Linguistic Profile of Gifted English Language LearnersHoda Kilani, Canada Session Chair: Joan Jacobs, Lincoln Public Schools4.5.5 Escalating The Challenge: Differentiation StrategiesBreanna Prochnow, United States; Elizabeth Ebers-Truesdale, United States; Joan Jacobs, United States4.5.6 Individual Education For Gifted Students To Preserve Their MotivationPetra Leinigen, Germany4.5.7 My Gifted Students Nailed It! What Now?Angela Wakshul, United States; Jo-Ann Shields, United States Session Chair: Lynette Breedlove, The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and ScienceS4.6.5 Student Voices: Attending A State-Wide Residential Stem High School On A University CampusLynette Breedlove, United States; Julia Roberts, United States; Zack Ryle, United States Session Chair: Lianne Hoogeveen, Radboud University4.7.5 Walk Out of A Meeting Smiling? Provocative Teaming Ideas For 2e Students, Parents, and EducatorsLinda Collins, United States; William Collins, United States4.7.6 Parent Advocacy Strategies For Accessing School-Based Gifted and Special Education ServicesTerence Friedrichs , United States4.7.7 Inclusive Education For Twice-Exceptional Gifted Students: Myths and Facts About The Frustration of TalentLianne Hoogeveen, Netherlands; Agnes Burger-Veltmeijer*, Netherlands; Alexander Minnaert*, Netherlands; Evelyn Kroesbergen*, Netherlands Session Chair: Heidrun Stoeger, University of RegensburgS4.8.5 The Role of Mentoring For Talent Development and ExcellenceHeidrun Stoeger, Germany; Rena Subotnik, United States; Barbara Kerr, United States; Laura Lunsford, United States Session Chair: Amy Graefe, University of Northern Colorado4.9.5 Fidelity of Implementation of The Total School Cluster Grouping Model: The Role of TeachersJuliana Tay, United States; Nielsen Pereira, United States; Alissa Cress, United States; Marcia Gentry, United States4.9.6 Total School Cluster Grouping (tscg): A Talent Development Approach To Programming In K-6Marcia Gentry, United States4.9.7 Grouping Students To Maximize Gifts, Talents, & Potential: What Gifted Students Say Works For ThemAmy Graefe, United States
11:30am-1:00pm
Bronson 1005Rand Dining Center
Session Chair: Leonie Kronborg, Monash University

Group A go to lunch at 11:30 AM

Group B go to lunch at 11:50 AM

Group C go to lunch at 12:10 PM

Your nametag will include your lunch group.

11:30am-11:50am
(Sarratt 197 Cinema)

Lunch Group B should attend this session.

11:50am-12:10pm
(Sarratt 197 Cinema)

Lunch Group C should attend this session.

12:20pm-12:50pm
(Sarratt 197 Cinema)Session Chair: Eleonoor van Gerven, Slim! Educatief

Lunch Group A should attend this session.

1:00pm-2:40pm
2eParentingProgrammingEducator BeliefsEducator BeliefsProgrammingDepth and ComplexityDiversityParenting
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomSarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220SLC Commodore BallroomSLC Meeting Rooms 1 & 2
Session Chair: Maryanne Haines4.1.8 Cycle For Success: Parenting and Teaching 2eJulie Skolnick, United States4.1.9 Finding Our Fractaled Children: Lessons Learned From Fractals In Nature: Casting A Wider NetLinda Collins, United States; William Collins, United States4.1.10 Strategies For Supporting Students Who Are 2eCharlton Wolfgang, United States; Richard Mehrenberg, United States4.1.11 The Adaptive Think-Aloud Framework: Is It Useful In The Preliminary Stage of Identifying Twice-Exceptionality?Maryanne Haines, Australia; Linley Cornish, Australia; Michelle Bannister-Tyrrell*, Australia Session Chair: Joan Jacobs, Lincoln Public Schools4.2.8 An Introduction To Understanding Your High Ability StudentJo Tuite, United States4.2.9 Supporting The Emotional Needs of Gifted Students and Parents In Title I SchoolsDornswalo Wilkins-McCorey, United States; Mary Robin Schumaker, United States; Dr. Ardene Bunch, United States4.2.10 Parenting Perfectionists: Scaffolding Failure and Building A Growth MindsetKimberley Perry, Australia4.2.11 Moving From “but What If” To “i Can”: Parenting The Anxious Gifted ChildJoan Jacobs, United States; Elizabeth Ebers-Truesdale, United States Session Chair: Astrid Lenvik, University of Bergen4.3.8 Gifted Students’ Perception of Gifted ProgrammingAndrea Hughs-Baird, United States4.3.9 What Helps Or Hinders The Achievement of Academically Talented Secondary School Boys?Graeme Miller, New Zealand4.3.10 School Engagement In High Ability Students: Developmental Trajectory, Contextual Factors, and Long-Term Educational OutcomesAlicia Ramos, Belgium; Karine Verschueren, Belgium; Bieke de Fraine, Belgium4.3.11 Tales From Norwegian Gifted YoungstersAstrid Lenvik, United States; Elisabeth Hesjedal*, Norway; Lise Jones*, Norway Session Chair: Mojca Juriševič, University of Ljubljana4.4.8 Giftedness and Gifted Education: Teachers’ Conception and Practice In The Indonesian ContextChairati Saleh, Australia; Leonie Kronborg, Australia4.4.9 Stakeholders’ Views of Gifted Education In The Netherlands and Flanders and The United StatesEleonoor van Gerven, Netherlands; C. Matthew Fugate, United States4.4.10 Regular Classroom Teachers' Perception of Gifted LearnersJack Mathoga Marumo, South Africa; Mike Mhlolo, South Africa4.4.11 Context Analysis On Attitudes Towards Gifted EducationMojca Jurisevic, Slovenia; Urska Zerak, Slovenia Session Chair: Claudia Cornejo, Monash University4.5.8 Teachers of The Gifted Learning In Online Courses Through Group StrategiesPaula Christensen, United States4.5.9 Professional Learning and Families: Working With Teachers To Create Learning Opportunities For ParentsKatie Lewis, United States; Angela Novak, United States4.5.10 Onboarding New Teachers In An All-Gifted Environment: Whys, Wherefores, and Saying Things Out LoudMelissa Bilash, United States; Jill Wurman, United States4.5.11 A Portrayal of Inspirational Teachers For Gifted and Highly Able Students: A Grounded Theory StudyClaudia Cornejo, Australia; Leonie Kronborg, Australia Session Chair: Sandra Kay4.6.8 Gifted Students’ Perceptions of Challenge: It’s Hard, It’s Fun, and They Want ItE. Jean Gubbins, United States; Pamela Peters, United States; Ashley Carpenter, United States; Del Siegle, United StatesS4.6.9 On Human Potential: Nurturing Talents, Cultivating ExpertiseSandra Kay, United States; Rena Subotnik, United States; Laurie Croft, United States Session Chair: Emily Mofield, Lipscomb University4.7.8 Imagine The Possibilities: Transform Math Instruction Using Strategies From Mentoring Mathematical MindsAngela Wakshul, United States; Jo-Ann Shields, United States4.7.9 Igniting Mathematical Minds: Rigorous Questioning Using The Icons of Depth and ComplexityJo-Ann Shields, United States; Angela Wakshul, United States4.7.10 Gifted Learners In The Mainstream SchoolClaire Ball, Australia; Emma Brice, Australia; Andrew Watts*, Australia4.7.11 Perceiving The Forest, Not The Trees: Problem-Solving For Global Issues and Social Studies ContentEmily Mofield, United States; Tamra Stambaugh, United States Session Chair: Marcia Gentry, Purdue University4.8.8 The Implementation of The Young Scholars Model In A Small, Diverse School DistrictStacy Hayden, United States; Kelly Miller, United StatesS4.8.9 Dreams Deferred: Access, Equity, and Missing Children In Gifted Education Across The United StatesMarcia Gentry, United States; Gilman Whiting, United States; Nielsen Pereira, United States; Anne Gray, United States Session Chair: Janette Boazman, University of DallasS4.9.8 Parenting For High Potential: Essential Caregiving Strategies For Nurturing The Whole Gifted ChildJanette Boazman, United States; Tracy Inman, United States; Michele Kane, United States; Kathy Nilles, United States
3:00pm-3:30pm
(Student Life Center)
3:30pm-4:30pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)Session Chair: Leonie Kronborg, Monash University

Finding and Nurturing Exceptional Intellectual Talent Over 45 Years: The Long-Term Impacts

The Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY), based at Vanderbilt University, has been tracking more than 5,000 highly-talented individuals for more than 45 years. Most were identified through talent searches at around age 13. The study’s findings have overturned conventional wisdom about exceptional talent and have shed valuable light on the educational policies and resources needed to support this population. In this address, SMPY co-director Camilla P. Benbow will discuss important findings for gifted education to have emerged from the study. For example, SMPY has shown that the talented and high-achieving knowledge-workers needed by our conceptual economy can be identified as early as age 12. Even among the most talented (0.01 percent) there is no threshold effect for ability. More is always better. Nevertheless, the pattern of specific abilities (and interests) does matter for education as well as career choice. Differences are further reflected in adulthood, where gifted men and women weigh the importance of work, family, and personal variables differently—even as they construct satisfying lives for themselves. Overall, SMPY has demonstrated that educational interventions on behalf of gifted students have both short-term and long-term positive benefits.

Sponsored by:

4:30pm-5:00pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)2 Gifted-Ebd: Program Design and Next StepsBarbara Lazarou, United States4 Twice-Exceptionality Research In Brazil: What do We Know?Aline Galassi, Brazil; Daniela Vilarinho-Rezende, Brazil6 Visual Literacy: Navigating A World Immersed In Visual LanguageDr. Martha Champa, United States; Dr. Susanna Hapgood, United States8 Examining Teacher Discourse In Stem Classrooms In A Summer Enrichment ProgramNesibe Karakis, United States; Nielsen Pereira, United States10 A Program For Nurturing The Potential of Indigenous Community Children From Arunachal Pradesh, IndiaMrinmayi Vaishampayan, India12 Fostering Career Success and Satisfaction For Gifted and Talented StudentsJoi Lin, United States14 Gifted and Faced With A Problem: The Ase of (meta)cognitive and Affective StrategiesChelsea O'Brien, Netherlands16 The Rubik'S Cube: A Unique Twist In Steam Gifted EducationDan van der Vieren, United States18 Helping The Gifted Children Solve Practical Problems With MathematicsZhijie Liu, China20 Gifted Children In Primary Schools: Children'S Perspectives As Participants Across Social Arenas, Activities, and TeachingCharlotte Madsen, Denmark22 The Relationship Between Creativity and Creative Dispositions Among Kindergarten Children In Hong KongHoi Wai Wong, Hong Kong24 Place-Based Learning: Acquiring 21st-Century Skills and Increasing Cultural Cognizance Through TravelAshley Scott, United States26 Thinking About Physics and Chemistry Through Feedback: A Path For Gifted StudentsMartin Konecny, Czech Republic
6:00pm-9:00pm
(Wildhorse Saloon)

You must register to attend the gala dinner. The cost is $90 USD and you can add the gala dinner by visiting www.worldgifted2019.com/registration.

Sunday, 28 July 2019
7:30am-10:00am
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)
8:00am-12:00pm
(Student Life 140 Board of Trust Room)
8:00am-9:40am
Social/EmotionalProgramming2eProgrammingIdentificationSchool AlternativesG&T
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomSarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220SLC Commodore BallroomSLC Meeting Rooms 1 & 2
Session Chair: Anna Payne, Baylor University5.1.2 Examining Teacher Perceptions About The Teaching and Learning of Mathematically Gifted Learners In South AfricaMichael Mhlolo, South Africa5.1.1 Accomplished Teaching Strategies That Work!Kelly Lomax, United States5.1.3 Global Suitcases: Training Teachers Through Authentic Case Studies of Diverse Gifted Immigrants Using Virtual SimulationsGillian Eriksson, United States; Jennifer Sanguiliano, United States5.1.4 Teachers Who Make A Difference: What Gifted Students SayAnna Payne, United States; Laurie Croft, United States Session Chair: Shane Kamsner, Carey Baptist Grammar School5.2.1 Using Mindfulness To Enhance Wellbeing For Gifted StudentsAntonia Szymanski, United States5.2.2 Mindfulness As A Changemaker For Global Peace: Gifted Children & Youth InvolvedDorothy Sisk, United States5.2.3 Perfect Pitch: Designing and Delivering A Student Centered Well-Being Program For Gifted ThinkersShane Kamsner, Australia; Carolyn Giles, Australia5.2.4 CancelledThis Session Has Been Cancelled, United States Session Chair: Beth Hahn, University of Cincinnati5.3.1 Applied Improvisation In The ClassroomChristiana Frank, United States5.3.2 Teaching Their Bodies, Not Their Brains: Instructing Physical Education Differently To Gifted ChildrenJill Wurman, United States; Jessica Curtiss, United States; Alexa Fusselbaugh, United States5.3.3 Is It Ok To Start Without A Plan? To Work Without A Net?Beth Hahn, United States; Karen Qualls, United States5.3.4 Self-Made Identity: How Using Avatars Influences Online BehaviorSusannah Wood, United States; Antonia (toni) Szymanski, United States Session Chair: Wendy Behrens, Minnesota Department of Education5.4.1 Trauma and The Gifted BrainMaria Katsaros-Molzahn, United States5.4.2 Pedro: A Twice-Exceptional StudentRenata Maia-Pinto, Brazil5.4.3 Paradox of Giftedness and Asperger’s Syndrome: A Case Study In A Private School In DubaiAida Younis, United Arab Emirates5.4.4 Exploring Issues of Identifying Twice-Exceptional Learners Through Case StudiesWendy A. Behrens, United States; C. Matthew Fugate, United States; Tracy Inman, United States Session Chair: Judith Lombard, Washoe County School District5.5.1 Engaging Our Gifted Students Using Authentic LearningTodd Stanley, United States5.5.2 Sustainability and Productivity In Gifted Education Programs: A New Vision From The University of JeddahFaisal Yahya Alamiri, Saudi Arabia5.5.3 Meeting The Needs of The Many; Gifted Programming From 2nd – 12th GradesJudith Lombard, United States; Cheri Dimartino, United States; Bonnie Pillaro, United States; Sean Johnson, United States5.5.4 Shared Journey, Different Perspectives: Snapshots From DownunderKathy Harrison, Australia; Mark Smith, Australia; Amy Horneman, Australia; Hayley Lewkowicz, Australia Session Chair: Ketty Sarouphim-McGill, Lebanese American University5.6.1 Identifying and Predicting Gifted Children’s Achievement Trajectories: Effects of Teachers, Peers, and Child CharacteristicsTessa Weyns, Belgium; Bieke de Fraine, Belgium; Karine Verschueren, BelgiumS5.6.2 Performance Based Assessments To Identify Gifted and Talented StudentsKetty Sarouphim-McGill, Lebanon; Abdulnasser Alhussaini, Saudi Arabia; C. June Maker, United States; Randal Pease, United States Session Chair: Mehdi Ghahremani, Purdue University5.7.1 Applying Sternberg’s Theory of Mental Self-Government To Explore Creative and Critical ThinkingMehdi Ghahremani, United States5.7.2 Powerful Strategies To Enhance The Learning of Gifted StudentsNathan Levy, United States5.7.3 Creativity Composure: Reasonable Identification and Practice, Reasonably AppliedBonnie O-Regan, United States; Yvonne-Nicole de St. Croix*, United States5.7.4 CancelledThis Session Has Been Cancelled, United States Session Chair: Susan Assouline, University of Iowa Belin-Blank Center5.8.1 The Impact of Outside-of-School Learning: Insights From “super Users” of Supplemental Gifted ProgramsSusan Corwith, United StatesS5.8.2 Acceleration: An Effective Option For The Development of TalentsSusan Assouline, United States; Ann Lupkowski-Shoplik, United States; Lianne Hoogeveen, Netherlands; Laurie Croft, United States Session Chair: Kimberley Perry, Emmanuel Catholic College5.9.1 Fostering Creativity From Age 0 To 8Srinivasan Muthusamy, IndiaS5.9.2 Establishing and Fostering Positive Partnerships: Collaboration and Twice/multi-Exceptional ChildrenKimberley Perry, Australia; Melinda Gindy, Australia; Bek Duyckers, Australia; Carolyn Prince, Australia
9:50am-11:05am
STEAMProgrammingDiversityG&TSocial/EmotionalProgrammingMiscDiversityMisc
Alumni Hall 100 LoungeAlumni Hall 201 ClassroomAlumni Hall 202 Joe C Davis Memorial HallAlumni Hall 206 Reading RoomSarratt 112Sarratt 197 CinemaSarratt 216/220SLC Commodore BallroomSLC Meeting Rooms 1 & 2
Session Chair: Maria P. Gomez-Arizaga, Universidad de los Andes5.1.5 Stemulate Engineering Academy: Authentic Learning Opportunities In Stem For Low-Income and Diverse LearnersDebbie Dailey, United States; Michelle Buchanan*, United States; Jason Trumble*, United States; Alicia Cotabish*, United States5.1.6 Career Interests In Science Among Malaysian Gifted and Talented StudentsRorlinda Yusof, Malaysia; Noriah Mohd Ishak*, Malaysia; Siti Noor Diana Mohd Kamaruddin*, Malaysia5.1.7 Socioemotional Characteristics of Gifted Female and Male Students In Science and MathematicsMaria P. Gomez-Arizaga, Chile; Marianela Navarro Ciudad, Chile; Annjeanette Martin, Chile Session Chair: Kelly Lomax, Mobile County Public School System5.2.5 The Five Habits of Mind: Critical Questioning For High Ability LearnersSeth Jaeger, Colombia5.2.6 Balancing Content Standards With The Hallmarks of Gt PedagogyJessica J. Reinhard, United States5.2.7 Building A Culture of Thinkers For Every LearnerKelly Lomax, United States Session Chair: Bruce Riegel, Maryland State Department of Education5.3.5 In Search of Equity: Providing Access To Training and Resources Through Free Online ResourcesBruce Riegel, United States; Wendy Behrens, United States5.3.6 Ethical Challenges Using Participatory Methods With Gifted AdolescentsLaurie Walden, United Kingdom5.3.7 Gifted and Multilingual Learners: How Can We Effectively Identify and Serve Them?Megan Parker Peters, United States; Jeanne Gilliam Fain, United States Session Chair: Tracy Inman, Western Kentucky University5.4.5 How Good Was That? Meaningful Ways To Assess Gifted and Talented Student LearningChristine Deitz, United States5.4.6 A World of Products: Encouraging Excellence Through Product ProtocolTracy Inman, United States; Julia Roberts, United States5.4.7 Depth and Complexity In Gifted Students: Understanding and Simplifying Differentiated AssessmentMelinda Gindy, Australia Session Chair: Mira Alameddine, LWIS-City International School5.5.5 Diversity of Characteristics of Gifted Anxiety Among Arabic-Islamic CultureGhazi Chakroun, Tunisia; Mira Alameddine, Lebanon; Mohammed Jafar Jamalallail, Saudi Arabia; Aysha Ajweh, Jordan5.5.6 Some Dimensions of Gifted Anxiety and The Prospect of The Future of Education and LifeGhazi Chakroun, Tunisia; Naima Benyakoub, Algeria5.5.7 The Application of The Gifted Anxiety Scale On Gifted Lebanese YouthMira Alameddine, Lebanon; Nidal Jouni, Lebanon Session Chair: Angela Novak, East Carolina UniversityS5.6.5 Practical Programming For Rural Gifted Teachers and AdministratorsAngela Novak, United States; Bronwyn Macfarlane, United States; Katie Lewis, United States Session Chair: Emily Mofield, Lipscomb University5.7.5 Mindsets of Underachievers: Understanding Why They Underachieve and What We Can doEmily Mofield, United States; Megan Parker Peters, United States5.7.6 Multiple Intelligences and Psychological Well-Being Among Gifted Students In Hong KongLai Kwan Chan, Hong Kong; David Chan*, Hong Kong; Huimin Liu, Hong Kong; Xiaoyan Sun, Hong Kong Session Chair: Del Siegle, National Center for Research on Gifted EducationS5.8.5 Results of Four Years' Research At The National Center For Research On Gifted EducationDel Siegle, United States; D. Betsy McCoach, United States; E. Jean Gubbins, United States; Daniel Long, United States; Carolyn Callahan, United States Session Chair: L. Kathleen Casper, Florida Association for the GiftedS5.9.5 Supporting Potentially-Gifted Learners In The Early Years (birth Through Age 5) Across The WorldL. Kathleen Casper, United States; Margaret Sutherland, United Kingdom; Dagmar Bergs-Winkels, Germany; Jo Dean, New Zealand; Andrea Delaune, New Zealand
11:05am-11:30am
(Student Life Center)
11:30am-12:30pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)

Learning Resources and Talent Development

Within both research and practice, there has long been a profound interest in more than just the identification of gifted individuals, but also in what has been described as “gifted environments,” “smart contexts,” or “talent hotspots.” These concepts form the idea that not only do individuals differ in their potential to create extraordinary accomplishments, environmentsdiffer, too, in their potential to make extraordinary accomplishments possible. Indeed, talent hotspots are rich in terms of learning resources. Moreover, modern theories of talent development maintain that the target of gifted education is no longer the gifted individual, but the aggregate consisting of the individual and his or her material, social, and informational environments. Such a body – that is, the individual and her personal environment – is framed as an Actiotope in the Actiotope Model of Giftedness. Within said Actiotope, learning resources are located in both the environment as well as in the individual, thus making it necessary to devise a theory that encompasses both. Consider that exogenous learning resources lay outsideof the individual, while endogenous learning resources can be found withinthe individual. These resources serve two main functions: (1) endogenous learning resources are necessary to process and to make full use of exogenous learning resources; and (2) they govern effective actions. This presentation offers a comprehensive categorization of learning resources, including five categories of exogenous learning resources credited as educational capital, and five categories of endogenous learning resources deemed learning capital. Practical implications of learning resource orientation for talent development are discussed in relation to two areas: talent identification and learning resource management, which is further illustrated with examples.

Sponsored by:

12:00pm-2:00pm
(Student Life 140 Board of Trust Room)
12:30pm-1:00pm
(SLC Commodore Ballroom)

Join us for the opening ceremony of the 23rd Biennial WCGTC World Conference!


 


Powered by OpenConf®
Copyright ©2002-2018 Zakon Group LLC