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2017 WCGTC Biennial World Conference

Full Program

We look forward to having you at the University of New South Wales in Sydney for the 2017 WCGTC World Conference!
Below you will find the schedule of sessions that includes many parallel sessions, poster presentations, and symposia covering a wide-range of topics. Each parallel session will last 25 minutes including questions

This is a preliminary schedule and is subject to change.

For additional information about the World Conference, please visit http://www.worldgifted2017.com.

To help you organise which presentations interest you and to bookmark your preferences, please use the check boxes next to the sessions below. This is not a pre-booking function and all sessions are on a first-come first-served basis. Click the Create My Program button at the bottom of the page, then save or print your personalized program through your browser.

Authors followed by an asterisk (*) are not presenting at the World Conference.


Thursday, 20 July 2017
8:00am-9:00am
9:00am-12:00pm
Mathews 101Mathews 102Mathews 103Mathews 104Mathews 105

Dr Seon-Young Lee
Seoul National University
South Korea

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc17.

Dr Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc17.

Professor Emerita Karen B. Rogers
University of St. Thomas
USA

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc17.

Dr Jane Piirto
Ashland University
USA

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc17.

Dr Margaret Sutherland
University of Glasgow
Scotland

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc17.

12:00pm-12:45pm

Lunch on July 20 is provided only for individuals participating in both morning and afternoon preconference workshops.

12:45pm-3:45pm
Mathews 101Mathews 102Mathews 103Mathews 104

Dr Klaus Urban
Hanover, Germany

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc17.

Ms Sue Prior
Australian International School
Hong Kong

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc17.

Dr Dorothy Sisk
Lamar University
USA

Dr Michele Kane
Northeastern Illinois University
USA

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc17.

Dr Julia Link Roberts
Western Kentucky University
USA

This preconference session requires registration. To register, visit https://www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc17.

2:00pm-4:00pm
(Clancy Foyer)
3:00pm-6:00pm
4:00pm-5:00pm
(Clancy)

Clancy Hall will open at 3:15 and the Opening Ceremony will begin at 4:00.

5:00pm-6:00pm
(Clancy)

Contextualising learning in STEM: A realistic pathway for teachers of gifted students

Dr. Jim Watters
Queensland University of Technology

6:00pm-7:30pm

The welcome reception is complimentary for all conference participants. There is a $50 USD charge for each additional guest. You may purchase additional tickets for guests at www.world-gifted.org/wcgtc17. Welcome reception tickets must be purhcased in advance and cannot be purchased on-site.

Friday, 21 July 2017
7:45am-1:00pm
(Clancy)

NSW Australian attendees will need to sign on each day to gain their full NESA accreditation.

8:00am-5:00pm
9:00am-9:30am
(Clancy)

Mark Scott
New South Wales Department of Education

9:45am-11:00am
ProgrammingG&TG&TEd TechProgrammingG&TSocial/EmotionalG&TSchool Alternatives
Mathews 101Mathews 102Mathews 103Mathews 104Mathews 230Mathews 231Mathews 232Mathews AMathews BMathews CMathews D
2.1.1 Mentoring for gifted secondary students: A unique school/university partnershipSusan Knopfelmacher, Australia2.1.2 A student perspective snapshot of life at James Ruse Agricultural High School, Sydney, AustraliaSandra Fernandez, Australia; Megan Connors, Australia2.1.3 A model for the education of gifted leaners- LWIS-City International School-LebanonMira Alameddine, Lebanon; Nather Simhari, Lebanon 2.2.1 Is femininity the new 'f' word?: An exploration of gender identity and talent development of high achieving femalesKate Lafferty, Australia2.2.2 What’s a girl to do? Popular culture and the aspirations of rural gifted girls.Denise Wood, Australia2.2.3 Theory into practice at a P-12 girls’ schoolKathy Harrison, Australia; Jo Ryan*; Kate Lafferty, Australia 2.3.1 Teacher as researcher: Empathy as the first step in designing provisions for highly able students.Desiree Gilbert, Australia2.3.2 Doctoral level education: Impact and influencesNorma Hafenstein, United States; Julia Watson, United States; Justine Lopez, United States; Kristina Hesbol, United States2.3.3 An analysis of student-to-student discussion posts in an online graduate gifted education classJoyce Miller, United States 2.4.1 Integrating technology and simulations that transform the gifted curriculum for culturally and internationally relevant learningGillian Eriksson, United States2.4.2 Holistic assessment and technology: Reaping the benefitsTrevor Tebbs, United States2.4.3 Developing an online learning environment that effectively caters to academically gifted and highly able secondary studentsStuart Fankhauser*, Australia; Tracey Mackin, Australia 2.5.1 Classical Chinese Children Primer: A gem in nurturing giftednessCaroline Kwok, Hong Kong2.5.2 Depth and complexity in the curriculum for gifted studentsMirella Olivier, Australia2.5.3 Early childhood educator attitudes towards giftedness and early entryMimi Wellisch, Australia 2.6.1 Mindsets and the development of talented dance studentsPenny Van Deur, Australia2.6.2 Developing musical talent into elite performance: A historical and educational perspectiveRachel White, Australia2.6.3 The unique barometers of giftedness through the eyes of the highly & profoundly giftedVanessa R. Wood, United States; Miraca Gross, Australia 2.7.1 Roles of giftedness, gender, and age in overexcitabilities: Highlighting instrument-sensitive group difference in emotional overexcitabilityYifan LYU, Hong Kong2.7.2 Existential group work: Meeting affective needs for the giftedPaula Christensen, United States2.7.3 Social and emotional needs of gifted children and the sixth language of loveLynn Berresford, New Zealand 2.8.1 Global partnerships to develop creative problem solvingC. June Maker, United States; Myra Wearne, Australia; Tracy Riley, New Zealand; Faisal Alamiri, Saudi Arabia; Melinda Webber, New Zealand; Katrina Sylva, New Zealand 2.9.1 Parents of twice exceptional children: A panel presentation for teachers and parentsGabrielle Oslington, Australia; Michelle Meltzer; Belinda Cooley; Louise Dutton 2.10.1 Change management for gifted programmingRachel Lam, Australia2.10.2 When Policy is not enough: One advocate's perspectiveElizabeth Singer, Australia2.10.3 Ethics of care in the construction of giftednessMelanie Wong, New Zealand 2.11.1 Leading and teaching for adolescent talent development: One high school’s SEAL experience from an insider and outsider’s perspectiveKate Mitchell, Australia; Leonie Kronborg, Australia2.11.2 Examining self-determination in graduates who entered college earlyNancy Hertzog, United States; Rachel U. Mun*; Sakhavat Mammadov*2.11.3 Abstract voices of parents: Sharing evaluation of an education response to young gifted childrenCarolyn Giles, Australia; Anne Grant, Australia
11:00am-11:30am
(Mathews Pavilion)
11:30am-12:45pm
DiversityG&TG&TCreativityIdentificationProgrammingProgrammingLeadershipSocial/Emotional
Mathews 101Mathews 102Mathews 103Mathews 104Mathews 230Mathews 231Mathews 232Mathews AMathews BMathews CMathews D
2.1.4 That was then; This is now: New opportunities for gifted/talented African American malesMark Mishou, United States2.1.5 Access and equity in gifted education: Paradigm shift and professional developmentNancy Hertzog, United States; Jann Leppien*; Jody Hess*2.1.6 Demystifying gifted: Race, representation, & restructuringLee Sapp, United States 2.2.4 Top-performing math students’ achievement and achievement motivation around the world: A meta-analysisLena Kristina Keller, Germany; Franzis Preckel*; Jacquelynne Sue Eccles*; Martin Brunner*2.2.5 Culture for knowing giftedness among children: Towards a research praxisZahirul Islam, Bangladesh2.2.6 Understanding educators perceptions and practices regarding culturally and linguistically diverse gifted learnersRobin Greene, United States 2.3.4 GT carpe diem: Empowering self-advocacyDeborah Douglas, United States2.3.5 Global use of gifted students' drawn images to personalize educational differentiationDorothy Armstrong, United States2.3.6 Like a thousand lizards on a flatbed truck: Integrating chaos and curricula for gifted learnersConstance (Connie) Brown, United States 2.4.4 Creative thinking in a regular classroom: Only for someDave Camilleri, Australia2.4.5 Fostering creativity in teaching gifted learners mathematics in regular classroom in high schoolsDimakatso Agnes Mohokare, South Africa2.4.6 Global interdependence is a reality!April Dennis, United States 2.5.4 T2i: Identification protocol in public schoolsAndree Therrien, Canada2.5.5 A toolbox for rigorous identification: Preschool – Year 12Angela Foulds-Cook, Australia; Jasna Poeszus, Australia2.5.6 Identifying the gifted when valid & reliable measures don't exist and a shortage of resourcesLeticia Jaquez, United States; Roman Jaquez*, United States 2.6.4 Clarity and fuzziness in the curriculum: Innovating curricula for high ability learnersLetchmi Devi Ponnusamy, Singapore; Ruilin Elizabeth Koh*2.6.5 Planning and delivering learning for verbally gifted students in secondary schoolShane Kamsner, Australia; Carolyn Giles, Australia2.6.6 Developing a growth mindset culture amongst academically gifted and highly able secondary studentsSue Harrap, Australia 2.7.4 Navigating a post-truth world: The affective impact of introducing literary theory to gifted studentsJames Koh, Singapore2.7.5 Reading- Novel course in gifted children’s educationQiong Wang, China2.7.6 Reading and the gifted: Developing a program of reading with a global perspectiveRobert (Bob) Seney, United States 2.8.4 Effective programming for developing talents among underserved populationsNielsen Pereira, United States; Marcia Gentry, United States; Gilman W. Whiting, United States; Yukiko Maeda, United States; Jennifer Richardson, United States 2.9.4 Publishing your work in gifted education: Ask the journal editorsJae Yup Jung, Australia; Leonie Kronborg, Australia; Michael S Matthews, United States 2.10.4 Gifted students’ and teachers’ perceptions of leaders and leadershipSeon-Young Lee, South Korea; Eunjoo Boo, South Korea; Yun-kyoung Kim, South Korea; Eunsun Kim*; Taehee Kim*; Hyunuk Park*2.10.5 Developing leadership identity: Universal needs necessary for cultural connectionsJustine Lopez, United States; Norma Hafenstein, United States; Kristina Hesbol, United States2.10.6 "From the horse's mouth" : Student voice in secondary school - a student perspectiveThomas Velican, Australia; Abel Muller, Australia 2.11.4 Personal best goal setting and self-regulation for engagement of gifted children in an enrichment programmeSusen Smith, Australia; Ben North, Australia; Andrew Martin*2.11.5 Do ability grouping and acceleration damage self-esteem? How ability grouping turns little fish into big fishMiraca Gross, Australia2.11.6 Thriving or surviving: Gifted students reflect on their senior high school experiences with high-stakes assessmentBen North, Australia; Susen Smith, Australia; Miraca Gross, Australia
12:45pm-1:45pm
(Mathews Pavilion)
1:45pm-3:00pm
GuidanceProgrammingG&TG&T2eSTEMProgrammingSocial/EmotionalProgramming
Mathews 101Mathews 102Mathews 103Mathews 104Mathews 230Mathews 231Mathews 232Mathews AMathews BMathews CMathews D
2.1.7 Stressful events experienced by academically high-achieving females before the onset of disordered eatingJennifer Krafchek, Australia; Leonie Kronborg, Australia2.1.8 "You're gifted, why are you here?" Counselling the gifted and talented.Wendy Stewart, Australia2.1.9 Familial influences on the career decision-making processes of gifted EFL high school students in VietnamHong Cao, Australia; Jae Jung, Australia; Susen Smith, Australia 2.2.7 Differentiated group work on heightening continuing motivation for high ability Ecoliteracy learnersChee Yong Travis Tan, Singapore; Huining Joyce Zhuang, Singapore2.2.8 From reluctant writer to masterful author: Pedagogy that supports the young gifted child’s writing developmentMichelle Bence, Canada2.2.9 Radiant measures: Data, planning, and programming across elementary and secondary gradesYvonne de St. Croix, United States 2.3.7 Narrative inquiry into practitioners' perspectives of gifted education in South AustraliaLesley Henderson, Australia2.3.8 Designing and assessment of standards-based professional development in gifted educationDebbie Troxclair, United States2.3.9 Developing a manuscript: Publishing in Gifted and Talented InternationalLeonie Kronborg, Australia; C. June Maker, United States; Nielsen Pereira, United States; Ann Robinson*; Barbara Kerr* 2.4.7 Partnerships with parents of young gifted children: Early childhood teachers’ perspectives in NSW, AustraliaKerry Hodge, Australia2.4.8 The ‘cost’ of giftedness: Neoliberal governance of early childhood education in Aotearoa New ZealandAndrea Delaune, New Zealand2.4.9 Talent development academies: Providing access and opportunity to advanced learning for underserved studentsJulie Swanson, United States; Laura Brock* 2.5.7 Twice-exceptionality – opportunities and possibilities: Three mixed-methods research studiesMichelle Bannister-Tyrrell, Australia; MaryAnne Haines, Australia; Anne O’Donnell-Ostini, Australia2.5.8 Methods for increasing twice exceptional self-efficacy: Ways to enhance "I can do it!"Claire Spicer, Australia2.5.9 A tale of two Es: Case studies of twice-exceptional students’ growth in an all-gifted schoolKimm Doherty, United States; Melissa Bilash, United States 2.6.7 The use of Arduinos in STEM education – A hands-on approachHui Leng Tan, Singapore; Puay Hong Yeo, Singapore2.6.8 STEM career pathway through research mentoring programme: The Malaysian gifted and talented students experienceNoriah Mohd. Ishak, Malaysia; Rorlinda Yusof, Malaysia2.6.9 An innovative pedagogic model that integrates scientific enrichment with intra-inter personal dimension to promote fulfillment of the potential of gifted studentsDr. Orni Meerbaum-Salant, Israel; Dr. bruria haberman, Israel; Sarah Pollack* 2.7.7 Problem-based learning: An apprenticeship in expert thinkingShelagh Gallagher, United States2.7.8 The effects of graphic organisers: Problem-Based Learning program on the critical and creative thinking abilities and the attitudes of the giftedShinDong Lee, South Korea; WoonJung Koh, South Korea; SoYoung Joo, South Korea2.7.9 ChallenGE Project: Applying design-thinking and design-based research to improve outcomes for gifted studentsJanet Farrall, Australia; Alice Duffield, Australia; Desiree Gilbert, Australia; Lesley Henderson, Australia 2.8.7 Do short term programs have a place in providing for gifted children?Helen Dudeney, Australia; Lyndal Reid, Australia; Carolyn Giles, Australia; Adrienne Alexander, Australia; Anne Grant, Australia 2.9.7 Problem solvers today – Leaders tomorrow!April Dennis, United States; Niranjan Casinader, Australia; Nicola Desoe, Australia 2.10.7 Mindfulness and development: Exploring the role of mindfulness in supporting studentsLaurie Croft, United States2.10.8 In practice, not just in theory: A developmental approach to supporting social and emotional growth in gifted studentsAnna Meuli, New Zealand2.10.9 Being with like-minds: A mixed methods study of gifted children's perspectivesTracy Riley, New Zealand; Deborah Walker, New Zealand 2.11.7 Using conceptual frameworks, tiered inquiry and assessment to engage gifted learners in mixed ability classroomsBronwyn MacLeod, Australia2.11.8 Learning through geographical field inquiry for high-ability learnersRoslinda Chan, Singapore2.11.9 Raising the quality of gifted and talented education through interdisciplinary learningJu Ah Kim, South Korea; Mi Kyung Lee, South Korea; Daniel Suh, South Korea
3:00pm-3:30pm
(Mathews)
3:30pm-4:00pm
1 Accounting for creativity: English teachers' understandings of creative practice across different educational contextsNarelle Wood, Australia2 Alternative education options for gifted and twice exceptional childrenKathleen Humble, Australia3 An exploratory study about the social and emotional development of gifted childrenEhun-Shik Moon, South Korea4 Another theory of relativity: Giftedness as conditionalityOwen Lo, Canada; Kuei-Fang Tsai*; Chen-Ming Chen*5 Early Entrance Program for Saudi Accelerated StudentsJawaher Bin Yousef, United Kingdom6 Middle school students in full-time gifted programmingLenae Lazzelle, United States7 MirrorsMohammad Awadh Rawas, Saudi Arabia8 Peer perceptions of academically high-performing adolescents in regular classrooms: A country-comparative analysis of gender and academic achievement levelHyerim Oh, Germany9 Peer perceptions of talented students in KoreaMyung-Seop Kim*; Seon-Young Lee, South Korea; Keunchan Baek, South Korea; Jongho Shin*10 Professional development and acceleration: Changing attitudes and practicesSusannah Wood*, United States; Laurie Croft, United States11 Teach from the heart: Meeting the social-emotional needs of diverse gifted learnersVickie Crockett, United States12 The context of cultivating creative and innovative talents under the contemporary maker movement: An analysis of American cases and Taiwan's experienceYUNG-LING CHI, Taiwan13 Tournament of Minds - a six-week challenge or a lifetime of valuable skills?Tanya Atherton, Australia
4:00pm-5:00pm
(Clancy)

Holistic Perspectives on Gifted Education for the 21st Century

Professor Kirsi Tirri
University of Helsinki

5:15pm-6:00pm
(Clancy)

All members of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children are invited to attend the General Members meeting.

6:00pm-6:45pm
(Clancy)

This meeting is for WCGTC members who have been elected to serve as Delegates for their country. Additional information about WCGTC Delegates may be found at https://www.world-gifted.org/about-us/delegates/.

Saturday, 22 July 2017
7:45am-1:00pm
(Back of Clancy)

NSW Australian attendees will need to sign on each day to gain their full NESA accreditation.

8:00am-5:00pm
8:30am-9:30am
(Clancy)

Harnessing Girls’ and Women’s Talent Potentials in STEM Domains

Professor Helen Watt
Monash University

9:45am-11:00am
G&TG&TG&TIdentificationProgrammingProgrammingSocial/EmotionalUnderachievementGuidance
Mathews 101Mathews 102Mathews 103Mathews 104Mathews 230Mathews 231Mathews 232Mathews AMathews BMathews CMathews D
3.1.1 Contributions of critical thinking to motivationBirsel Nemlioglu, Turkey; Umit Davasiıgil, Turkey3.1.3 Development and validation of Self-concept Inventory for Preschooler (SCI-K)Kyunghwa Lee, South Korea; Jinyoung Koh* 3.2.1 Forensics@Kristin: Who Dunnit?Raewyn Casey, New Zealand3.2.2 Architecture workshop for high talented children: Experience and methodAna Gallego, Spain3.2.3: 1 + 1 + 4 = Thousands of kidsDeborah Walker, New Zealand 3.3.1 Russia: State of talentsAndrey Barkin, Russia3.3.2 Balancing the gap between the acceleration policy and the instructional practices for the accelerated gifted and talented students in Saudi Arabian schoolsFaisal Alamiri, Saudi Arabia 3.4.1 Re-envisioning culturally proficient leadership to expand student success for all: Examining the identification of underrepresented minority gifted children in rural ColoradoKristina Hesbol, United States; Norma Hafenstein, United States; Justine Lopez, United States; Julia Watson, United States3.4.2 Identifying the gifted learner in a rural contextCarmel Meehan, Australia3.4.3 Gifted identification in rural and remote areasChristine Ireland, Australia 3.5.1 Philosophy for children: Our story of philosophy withdrawal gifted groups influencing whole school curriculum changeCraig Davidson, Australia; Rebecca Napier, Australia3.5.2 The IB’s Middle Years Program – A good fit for gifted learners in Qatar?Jeffrey MacRaild, Qatar3.5.3 Special schools for the gifted in Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and Egypt: Past, present and futureNasser Almutairi, Australia 3.6.1 Developing a system-wide approach to gifted educationCraig Wattam, Australia; Sally Brock, Australia; Christine Chapple, Australia3.6.2 A holistic model for serving the needs of identified gifted studentsKathryn Grubbs, United States; Nancy Hertzog, United States3.6.3 Gifted education programming: One size does not fit all – a vision from the coalfaceNancy Wines, Australia; Geraldine Townend, Australia 3.7.1 Human raising with relationships in mind - The scientific wayKaterina Morjanoff, Australia3.7.2 Compassionate empathy and emotional fragility: Supporting the sensitive gifted childMichele Kane, United States3.7.3 Talent development, career exploration, work habits, meaning in life, and connectedness of Chinese adolescentsMantak Yuen, China; Jesus Alfonso D. Datu*; Shui-wai Wong*; Josephine Yau*; Norma C. Gysbers* 3.8.1 A cross-cultural comparison of leading school models for engaging intellectually able students: USA and AustraliaLeonie Kronborg, Australia; Julia Link Roberts, United States; Toni Meath, Australia; Kate Mitchell, Australia; Roger Page, Australia 3.9.1 Professional learning in gifted education: Models, research, and practiceLaurie Croft, United States; Connie Phelps, United States; Wendy Behrens, United States; Kimberley Chandler, United States; Christine Weber, United States; Dina Brulles, United States 3.10.1 Elements that help or hinder the achievement of academically gifted and talented secondary school boysGraeme Miller, New Zealand3.10.2 Identification of underachievement in ability grouped settingsRuth Phillips, Australia3.10.3 The effect of two interventions on high ability underachievers in an independent schoolLye Chan Long, Australia; Adrienne Erwin, Australia 3.11.1: 20 years later: Revisiting attitudes of adolescent gifted girls and boys towards education, achievement, and the futureJane Jarvis, Australia3.11.2 The frustration inferno: Counselling gifted children experiencing chronic boredom and acute frustrationFiona Smith, Australia; Dominic Westbrook, Australia3.11.3 Gifted girls speak out: A qualitative study exploring career development experiences of gifted adolescent girlsRebecca Napier, Australia
11:00am-11:15am
(Mathews Pavilion)
11:15am-12:30pm
DiversityIdentificationProgramming2eCreativityLeadershipSocial/EmotionalG&TProgramming
Mathews 101Mathews 102Mathews 103Mathews 104Mathews 230Mathews 231Mathews 232Mathews AMathews BMathews CMathews D
3.1.4 Equity and excellence in gifted education: Meeting the needs of underserved learnersApril Wells, United States3.1.5 Scenario performance: Creating new options for demonstrating problem solving for children beyond the squareChristine Casinader, Australia3.1.6 Gifted English Language Learners - Success stories in secondary schoolsAranzazu Blackburn, Australia 3.2.4 A case study: A comparison of identification and assessment processes between second and fourth grade students enrolled in Turkish Science and Art Centers (SACs): From the experts’ perceptionsAbdullah Eker, Turkey; Hakan Sarı*3.2.5 Diversified Model of Identifying Gifted Students: An exploratory study in India classroomsJyoti Sharma, India3.2.6 The Gifted Rating Scale for the Marginalised (GRSM)Kyung-Sook Lee, South Korea; Shin-Dong Lee, South Korea; Jinho, H. Kim, South Korea; Sang-Hee Lee, South Korea 3.3.4 Student agency in a New Zealand specialist gifted programmeMadelaine Willcocks, New Zealand3.3.5 The seven challenges of the gifted childFemke Hovinga, Netherlands; Tijl Koenderink, Netherlands3.3.6 Using student feedback to monitor and enhance programming strategies for talent developmentNicole Sabbadin, Australia 3.4.4 ‘Self-propelled learning’: Facilitating talent development in highly able individuals on the autism spectrumSusan Wade, Australia; Leonie Kronborg, Australia3.4.5 Using a strengths -based approach to support twice exceptional learners in the classroomAmanda Drury, Australia3.4.6 Teachers’ perceptions of their preparedness to meet the needs of gifted and twice-exceptional learnersGeraldine Townend, Australia 3.5.4 Family and school connectedness in the development of creative and critical thinking self-efficacyRicci W. Fong, Hong Kong3.5.5 The relationships between achievement factors and creativity: Why they are different and how they can be explainedDonggun An, South Korea3.5.6 Creative engineering and design in action: Designing and evaluating learning activities connecting engineering and creativityNielsen Pereira, United States; Mehdi Ghahremani*; Shawn Jones* 3.6.4 Professional training: Developing leaders in gifted educationLaurie Croft, United States; Anna Payne, United States3.6.5 Leadership development in gifted adolescentsLynne Maher, Australia3.6.6 Student-led action research for the primary grades: Growing gifted students into civic minded inquisitive researchersKatherine Martin, United States; Michael Moss*; Carmela Fowler* 3.7.4 Exploring the relationship between intelligence and popularity: The social and academic popularity of gifted elementary studentsAbdulkadir Bahar, United States3.7.5 Mapping common ground: Relationships between giftedness, introversion, and heightened sensitivitiesJodie Valpied, Australia3.7.6 Self-handicapping, achievement goals, and self-efficacy of gifted studentsHarun Tadik*; Abdullah Eker, Turkey 3.8.4 Learnings from a national community supporting professionals working with gifted and talented students in Aotearoa, New ZealandLouise Tapper, New Zealand; Nadine Ballam, New Zealand; Jo Dean, New Zealand; Andrea Delaune, New Zealand 3.9.4 Essential connections: Inspiring and promoting creative teacher leadership to transform gifted educationGillian Eriksson, United States; Dorothy Sisk, United States; Margaret Sutherland, United Kingdom 3.10.4 Conditions gifted students and their peers prefer when working alone and with others on a challenging projectLannie Kanevsky, Canada3.10.5 Examining critical issues in gifted education: A case study approachWendy A Behrens, United States; Christine L. Weber, United States3.10.6 Mapping gifted knowing and thinking in the classroom: A prelude to effective differentiated pedagogyJohn Munro, Australia; Joseph Santoro, Australia 3.11.4 Developing gifted potential through the promotion of autonomous learning: A case study in a selective entry secondary school for the performing artsJulie Haskell, Australia3.11.5 Promoting cultural relevance in the secondary classroom through arts integrationKimberley Chandler, United States3.11.6 Talented and gifted: Music education for exceptional studentsMarshall Haning, United States
12:30pm-1:30pm
(Mathews Pavilion)
1:30pm-2:30pm
(Clancy)

Gifted but disadvantaged

Dr. Chester Finn
Senior Fellow, The Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and Distinguished Senior Fellow & President Emeritus, Thomas B. Fordham Institute

2:30pm-3:45pm
Ed TechG&TG&TProgrammingDifferentiationAdvocacySocial/EmotionalG&TIdentification
Mathews 101Mathews 102Mathews 103Mathews 104Mathews 230Mathews 231Mathews 232Mathews AMathews BMathews CMathews D
3.1.7 Investigation of internet addiction in gifted students according to the different variablesAhmet Kurnaz, Turkey; Aynur Usta*3.1.8 Impact of the difference in e-feedback patterns within a simulation-based software to teach programming for gifted studentsSeham Alnafea, Saudi Arabia3.1.9 Mind the gap: Youngsters growing up in the digital ageLaura Hayward, United States 3.2.7 The importance of culture in defining and accommodating giftedness: A Lebanese perspectiveMaya Antoun, Lebanon; Leonie Kronborg, Australia; Margaret Plunkett, Australia3.2.8 Can we legislate for gifted education?Kai Zhang, United Kingdom3.2.9 Talent support networks ensuring capacities and a quality of talent developmentStanislav Zelenda, Czech Republic 3.3.7 The state of gifted education in Australia: A SWOT analysisJae Yup Jung, Australia3.3.8 To “reach your potential” – should that really be the question? Re-thinking ideas around underachievement.Louise Tapper, New Zealand3.3.9 Developing national programming for advancing the gifted and talented in IsraelEli Fried, Israel 3.4.7 Educational alchemy: How project-based learning and an ancient mystery transformed gifted children into a teamAllyson O'Rourke-Barrett, United States; Jill Williford Wurman, United States3.4.8 Using rich tasks as differentiation in the elementary mathematics classroomGabrielle Oslington, Australia3.4.9 How to teach physics and chemistry to gifted children?Martin Konecny, Czech Republic 3.5.7 A multi-modal approach in teaching chemical bonding using the Parallel Curriculum ModelLi Kheang Koo, Singapore; Wei Quan Daniel Soh*3.5.8 Differentiated curriculum using conceptual frameworks, inquiry-based learning and the Australian CurriculumKath Morwitch, Australia; Alex Galland, Australia; Lisa Cockerill*, Australia3.5.9 Leading differentiated learning for the giftedManoj Chandra Handa, Australia 3.6.7 Public attitudes towards the gifted: Myth and realityElizabeth Jones, United States; Dr. Shelagh Gallagher, United States3.6.8 The state of gifted education in the U.S.: Patchwork, problematic...and promisingJenny Nance*, United States; Melissa Bilash, United States; Wendy Behrens3.6.9 Pathways to professional proficiency in gifted education: A process and productJulia Watson, United States; Norma Hafenstein, United States 3.7.7 Difference in bullying and victimization between academically gifted and normal group: Multi-group analysis of cross-sectional latent means and longitudinal stabilityByeong-Ho Choi, South Korea; Seon-Young Lee, South Korea3.7.8 Bullying among gifted studentsHalil Aslan, Turkey; Ozgur Erdur-Baker, Turkey3.7.9 Socio-emotional issues among gifted and talented students: Implication to guidance and counselling servicesRorlinda Yusof, Malaysia; Noriah Mohd Ishak*, Malaysia; Afifah Mohd Radzi 3.8.7 Realising potential: Practical programming for the highly able in the 21st centuryMark Smith, Australia; Hayley Lewkowicz 3.9.7 Making gifted education more inclusiveGilman W. Whiting, United States; Marcia Gentry, United States; Nielsen Pereira, United States; C. Matthew Fugate, United States; F. Richard Olenchak, United States 3.10.7 Undertaking pedagogical change in an academically selective high school: The beginning of a journeyMark Long, Australia; Bronwyn MacLeod, Australia; Ruth Phillips, Australia3.10.8 Re-establishing Perth Modern School as Western Australia's only fully selective school for academically gifted studentsLois Joll, Australia; Val Furphy, Australia3.10.9 The trials and tribulations of establishing Australia’s first fulltime school for gifted childrenLynda Simons, Australia; Christine Grzesik, Australia 3.11.7 Defensible identification: We can’t lead differentiation if we don’t know who we have!Karen Rogers, United States3.11.8 Multiple Identification Model for the gifted children in IndiaAnitha Kurup, India; Shalini Dixit*; Ajay Chandra*
3:45pm-4:00pm
(Mathews)
4:00pm-4:30pm
14 A narrative journey of a profoundly gifted student in mainstream schoolingKylie Booker, Malaysia15 A study on the use of formative feedback and growth portfolio to enhance self-regulatory capacity amongst high-ability learners.Rohaida Ismail, Singapore16 Beyond imagining: A case study in building comprehensive gifted services that embrace diversityDina Brulles, United States17 Design-based research practices for the implementation of gifted education provisions in Australian schoolsDanielle Cioffi, Australia18 Developing creative and critical problem solving skills in lower primary classrooms: a structured approachNicola Desoe, Australia19 Enabling cultures for acceleration: Gifted girls in single-sex secondary schools in New ZealandMargaret Crawford, New Zealand20 Gifted education in Norway, from teachers' perspectivesAstrid Lenvik, Norway; Lise Øen Jones*; Elisabeth Hesjedal*21 How far can multiculturalism advance the learning of social studies for the gifted in Singapore?See Ping Loh, Singapore22 Impactful service: Authentic professorship in the gifted education communityJoyce MIller, United States23 Improve students’ mathematics-learning abilityYing Huang, China24 Investigating active learning in a Biology classroom through an inquiry approach for high ability learnersAi Khim Lim, Singapore; Tien Lee*25 Multi-genre projects: Rigor and creativity in the classroomSusanna Hapgood, United States; Martha Champa, United States26 The application of modeling in biology teachingLirong Zhang, China27 The effect of frustration caused by difficult tasks on gifted learners' achievements.Chelsea O'Brien, Netherlands
4:30pm-5:30pm
(Clancy)

Organic Creativity in the Classroom: Teaching to Intuition in Academics and in the Arts

Dr. Jane Piirto
Ashland University

5:30pm-5:50pm
(Clancy)
6:30pm-9:30pm

You must register to attend the gala dinner. The cost is $88 USD and you can add the gala dinner by visiting www.worldgifted2017.com/registration.

Sunday, 23 July 2017
7:45am-1:00pm
(Back of Clancy)

NSW Australian attendees will need to sign on each day to gain their full NESA accreditation.

8:00am-2:00pm
8:30am-9:30am
(Clancy)

Talent Dissemination: A Path Leading into the Future GT Education

Dr. Seon-Young Lee
Seoul National University

9:45am-11:00am
School AlternativesProgrammingG&TParentingIdentificationSocial/EmotionalProgramming
Mathews 101Mathews 102Mathews 103Mathews 104Mathews 230Mathews 231Mathews 232Mathews AMathews BMathews C
4.1.1 Homeschooling your gifted childNoel Jett, United States; Nancy Shastid, United States4.1.2 Educating gifted learners at home: Perspectives and lived experiencesCharlton Wolfgang, United States4.1.3 Feniks: a drop-out center for twice exceptional high school studentsTijl Koenderink, Netherlands; Femke Hovinga, Netherlands 4.2.1 What role does reflective thinking play in assessing the understanding and growth about Differentiation?Christine Weber, United States; Wendy Behrens, United States4.2.2 The Investigation of Metacognitive Levels of Elementary TeachersÇiğdem Nilüfer Umar, Turkey; Gülşah Batdal Karaduman*4.2.3 Interactions between high school teachers and a gifted student in a mixed-ability classroom: Teachers’ response stylesNaama Benny, Israel; Ron Blonder* 4.3.1 Embedding gifted education in regional pre-service teacher educationMargaret Plunkett, Australia4.3.2 Creativity as described by young, Ekphrastic Poetry Contest winnersMartha Champa, United States4.3.3 Can I handle this highly-intelligent but maladjusted gifted student? International comparison of gifted stereotypingSvenja Matheis, Germany; Franzis Preckel*; Leonie Kronborg, Australia 4.4.1 Creative Characteristics and Strategies for Developing Creative Potential in Teachers' PerceptionJane Farias Chgaas Ferreira, Brazil4.4.2 Counselling parents of gifted children: A Brazilian experienceDenise Fleith, Brazil; Daniela Vilarinho-Rezende, Brazil4.4.3 Enabling parents, enabling childrenJulia Bailey, Australia 4.5.1 Development and validation of Self-Directed Learning Ability TestSuyeon Kim, South Korea; Hyesung Park, South Korea; Kyunghwa Lee, South Korea4.5.2 Identifying gifted students in multiple areas and targeting strategies to turn potential into performanceBrooke Trenwith, New Zealand4.5.3 Using the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-Second Edition (CTONI-2) in identifying gifted students in OmanMohamed Ahmed, Oman 4.6.1 Gender, levels of intelligence, academic performance, and perfectionism in Indonesian gifted and non-gifted studentsFitriani Yustikasari Lubis, Indonesia; Lydia Freyani Hawadi*; Rose Mini Agoes Salim*; Urip Purwono*4.6.2 Finding Control in Chaos: Understanding Perfectionism, Substance Abuse, and Self-Destructive Behaviour in Gifted StudentsKate Burton, Australia4.6.3 School library user stereotypes – the students speak out! A mixed method study exploring the role of secondary school libraries in the lives of gifted studentsMariusz Sterna, Australia 4.7.1 Singular and plural: Balancing individually differentiated curriculum with cohort and group learning in gifted educationJill Williford Wurman, United States; Melissa Bilash, United States4.7.2 Cluster grouping at OLGC: Meeting the needs of gifted learners in a mainstream settingJanet Agostino, Australia4.7.3 Making it work: Supporting and measuring growth in a gifted cluster grouping modelDina Brulles, United States 4.8.1 But I'm a second-grader! Benefits and challenges of gifted accelerationMarshall Haning, United States; Rachael Haning, United States; Emily Edwards, Australia 4.10.1 Insights into practice and research of William-Stern-Association for gifted research and gifted educationNina Krüger, Germany; Sören Fiedler, Germany; Mara Suhren-Geipel, Germany; Mieke Johannsen, Germany; Marguerite Peritz, Germany; Mara Ohligschläger, Germany
11:00am-11:30am
(Mathews Pavilion)
11:30am-12:45pm
CreativityParentingSocial/EmotionalParentingGuidanceG&TAcceleration2e
Mathews 101Mathews 102Mathews 103Mathews 104Mathews 230Mathews 231Mathews 232Mathews AMathews BMathews C
4.1.4 The development and effects of a parent education program for creativity improvement using art activities and thinking toolsSun-Hee An, South Korea; EunHyun Sung, South Korea4.1.5 Out on a limb!Susan Nikakis; Geraldine Nicholas4.1.6 Cultivating imagination with Elegant ProblemsSandra I Kay, United States 4.2.4 The making of a modern day renaissance man (The unique case of Jozef Erece)Maynard Erece, Australia4.2.5 Is it a problem if Australian schools don’t foster mathematical promise? Parent perspectives and implicationsSimone Zmood, Australia4.2.6 Experiences in unleashing talent of twice-exceptional students in a homeschooled situationRaquel Bronsoler, Mexico 4.3.4 Belonging: Young gifted children starting schoolAnne Grant, Australia4.3.5 Meeting young children’s emotional needs through transitionsJo Dean, New Zealand4.3.6 Global perspectives on the Tall Poppy SyndromeConnie Phelps, United States; Bailey Carter, United States; Abby Phelps*, United States 4.4.4 Parenting gifted children 101: An introduction to gifted kids and their needsTracy Inman, United States4.4.5 A process oriented talent development model for guiding gifted childrenDesirée Houkema, Netherlands; Nora Steenbergen-Penterman; Yvonne Janssen4.4.6 Early childhood inclusion in care giving: Exploration into policy and practice for gifted childrenMahal Hosne Tilat*; Zahirul Islam, Bangladesh; Hossain Md. Monir* 4.5.4 Bright to brilliant: Coaching for high ability children and their familiesAlan D. Thompson, Australia4.5.5 Predictors of STEM career intentions for gifted international exchange students with Australian educational experiencesPeta K. Hay, Australia; Jae Yup Jung, Australia; Tay T.R. Koo*4.5.6 Reading fiction as existential inspiration for the giftedPaula Christensen, United States 4.6.4 Developing the Talent of StudentsSrinivasan Muthusamy, India4.6.5 Performance in working memory and attentional networks in gifted childrenAlexandre Aubry, France; Béatrice Bourdin*4.6.6 Building a new gifted and talented program in Saudi ArabiaRobyn Collins, Saudi Arabia 4.7.4 Long-term effects of grade skipping – spanning 70 yearsAnnette Heinbokel, Germany4.7.5 To accelerate or not: Negotiating the secondary mathematics curriculum with mathematically able adolescent femalesJulie Bartley - Buntz, Australia; Leonie Kronborg, Australia4.7.6 Acceleration: A prominent curriculum option for gifted studentsGail Young, Australia; Kathlyn Dyer*; Neil Adams, Australia 4.8.4 Cross cultural instrumentation for gifted education research and programming: Purdue’s repositoryMarcia Gentry, United States; Nielsen Pereira, United States; Rachael Kenney, United States; C. Matthew Fugate, United States; Yukiko Maeda, United States 4.9.4 The creative spirit: Actually, not figurativelyC. June Maker, United States; Dorothy Sisk, United States; Manoj Chandra Handa, Australia 4.10.4 When the world is just too rough: Twice exceptional gifted children with sensory processing disorderYee Han Chu, United States; Bradley Myers, United States4.10.5 ADHD and the gifted child: Dual exceptionality or paradox?Melinda Gindy, Australia4.10.6 Which gifted students are more likely to become disengaged from regular secondary education? An analysis of learning profilesJohn Munro, Australia
12:45pm-1:45pm
(Mathews Pavilion)
1:45pm-2:45pm
(Clancy)

Worth the Effort:  Finding and Supporting Twice Exceptional Learners in Schools

Professor Karen Rogers
University of St. Thomas

2:45pm-4:00pm
(Clancy)

 

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